exserted

(redirected from exsert)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

exserted

[ek′sərd·əd]
(biology)
Protruding beyond the enclosing structure, such as stamens extending beyond the margin of the corolla.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
--strong irregular axial ridges with little or no spiral sculpture; not obviously globose, more or less level with first teleoconch whorl or at most weakly exsert [Herpetopoma (s.s.), most species of Vaceuchelus and 'Euchelus7 guttarosea Dall, 1889 (Moolenbeek & Faber 1989)] (Fig.
Acicular crystal growth on the exsert septa of Galaxea fascicularis is probably continuous, as evidenced by their lack of crystal substructure (Clode and Marshall, 2003).
27A, C): Greyish white, more or less level with first teleoconch whorl or at most weakly exsert; diameter ca 270 um; terminal lip distinct, shallowly convex; superficial sculpture well developed, irregular and wavy, with a predominant axial alignment; no spiral component evident.
fascicularis exsert septa (four septa from each polyp) were removed from the corallite with forceps, under a dissecting microscope, and mounted flat using carbon tape.
59A, C): Apex missing or heavily encrusted in most specimens; protoconch remaining only in some juveniles and rather worn even in these; translucent white; diameter ca 260 um; moderately exsert; terminal lip roundly angled between mid-whorl and apical suture; superficial sculpture eroded in all available material.
Repeated sampling of silks on unpollinated ears indicated that the female inbred in Field F required about 7 d to exsert 95% of the silks on an average ear.
This dynamic requires a simultaneous calculation of silks exserted per plant and an estimate of the percentage of plants beginning to exsert silks.
Compared to included stamens, which require that the pollinators enter the floral tube for pollen to be picked up, separated and exserted stamens can contact most visitors approaching the flower and thus are available to generalized pollinators, such as hoverflies and quickly-visit bees (e.g.
Corolla gamopetalous, tubular-campanulate, infundibuliform, campanulate or hypocrateriform, sometimes with bilabiate apex, aestivation imbricate, zygomorphic; stamens included or exserted, 4, rarely reduced to 2, didynamous, staminode reduced, glabro, rarely elongate and pilose; filaments adnate to the corolla at the base; anthers commonly divergent, generally glabrous, rarely pilose; pollen grains many, in monads, rarely in tetrads or polyads; nectariferous disk generally present; gynoecium bicarpellate, bilocular; ovary superior, multiovulate, placentation axial, stigma bilamelate, lobes sensitive (closing after contact with pollinator).
The implicated traits include: a red, deep, narrowly tubular corolla; a lack of evident scent; absence of any conspicuous "landing platform"; and, anthers/stigmas exserted just enough to daub and pick up pollen on the hovering hummingbird's facial feathers as it imbibes nectar (Grant and Grant, 1968; Wilson et al., 2004).
Style 25-35mm long, straight, glabrous, conspicuously exserted; stigma truncate.
The most peculiar characters of this taxon are located in the flowers, which are strongly zygomorphic with an urceolate and markedly bilateral calyx; sepals are light yellow (lower altitude populations) or purple (higher altitude populations); there are existing populations that show yellow-purplish sepals as an intermediate character; the adaxial sepals are larger than the abaxial; the abaxial are suborbicular to broadly ovate-cordate, forming a distinctive banner like hood, keeled, 4-6 x 6-8 mm; petals are subincluded or barely exserted, purplish or brownish, especially on the veins.