exsolution


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exsolution

[¦ek·sə′lü·shən]
(geology)
A phenomenon during which molten rock solutions separate when cooled.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the Zn isotopic fractionation during the fluid exsolution and leaching process [27,28] has been ignored in Duan et al.
The resulting mechanical colour zoning is therefore linked to exsolution of these particles and also is epigenetic.
This excess pressure may be due to the formation of bubbles by gas exsolution, or to the fact that heat loss from the magma to its cooler surroundings causes the growth of crystals that are less dense than the magmatic liquid and so occupy a larger volume.
The method is demonstrated with spectrum images of the [Fe.sup.3+]/[SIGMA]Fe changes occurring across mineral interfaces between ilmenite ([Fe.sup.2+]Ti[O.sub.3]) and magnetite ([Fe.sup.2+] [Fe.sup.3+.sub.2][O.sub.4]) in a sample with microscale exsolution lamellae.
Fast cooling of volcanic ash avoids exsolution of feldspar and favours the preservation of magmatic sanidine; therefore calculation of the feldspar composition according to the method proposed by Orville can be estimated as accurate.
Okorusu magnetites exhibit abundant exsolutions of ulvospinel in a characteristic cloth texture, and oxidation exsolution occurred subsequently.
Engineers from Calgary-based Norwest felt that pressure from the mud circulation system would minimize exsolution of gasses from the oil sand and reduce the probability of slabbing from the shaft walls.
Degradation can be caused by solid-gas and solid-solid interactions, exsolution, and compound formation.
The increase in Li content recorded by the chemical composition of Li-micas appears therefore as a proxy of the progressive exsolution of the early Li-rich magmatic fluid (L1) from the Beauvoir granite.
First, [H.sub.2]O saturation occurs by exsolution of an aqueous fluid to forma distinct phase in the silicate melt, at which point the fluid boils and gas bubbles form.
The assemblage titanite-magnetite-quartz-pyrrhotite may be a late auto-oxidation and sulphidation product of vapour exsolution (Candela 1991), as it is not consistent with high Fe (-Ti) biotite (Wones 1981).
The copper appears to have formed by epigenetic exsolution from elbaite.