extended ASCII


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Related to extended ASCII: Unicode

extended ASCII

[ik¦sten·dəd ′as‚kē]
(communications)
An addition to the standard American Standard Code for Information Interchange, namely, characters 128 through 255; includes letters with diacritics, Greek letters, and special symbols.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

extended ASCII

The second half of the ASCII character set (characters 128 through 255). Designed in the 1960s, ASCII was originally a 7-bit code (0 through 127). To accommodate foreign languages, the DOS code set added various characters; however, more than 200 extended ASCII encodings were developed. The Unicode character encoding was created to handle every language on the planet (see Unicode).


The DOS Code Page for the U.S.
In DOS and Windows, extended ASCII characters can be entered by holding down the Alt key and entering the extended ASCII number on the numeric keypad on the keyboard.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The rest of the possible characters, represented by the numbers, 128 through 255, were originally defined on PCs by an unofficial standard called IBM extended ASCII. This former industry standard has now been replaced for Windows-based applications by Microsoft's extended character set.(1) There is, however, one important library application that does not use either the Windows or IBM extended character set definition: the MARC record.
There is, however, one important library application that does not use the original extended ASCII definition: the MARC record.

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