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Related to externus: Obliquus externus abdominis

external

1. Politics of or involving foreign nations; foreign
2. of, relating to, or designating a medicine that is applied to the outside of the body
3. Anatomy situated on or near the outside of the body
4. Education denoting assessment by examiners who are not employed at the candidate's place of study
5. Austral and NZ (of a student) studying a university subject extramurally
6. Philosophy (of objects, etc.) taken to exist independently of a perceiving mind
7. Austral and NZ a student taking an extramural subject
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References in periodicals archive ?
Obturator externus bursa: anatomic origin and MR imaging features of pathologic involvement.
It is limited dorsal-laterally with the squamosal region by the meatus acusticus externus and the crista nuchalis transversa.
6D, 7A, 8); with a single pair of receptacles, each connected to the uterus externus through a long and thin spermathecal 'neck' covered by glandular pores; receptacles globose, without glandular pores, set close to each other (Figs.
Muscles and ligaments involved in flexion and extension of the stifle joint may contract after luxation; these include flexor (flexor crurus medialis and gastrocnemius) and extensor muscles (iliotibialis cranialis, iliotibialis lateralis, femorotibialis internus, femorotibialis externus and medius, and iliofibularis).
The muscle layer of obliquus internus, transverse abdominis and obliquus externus that were separated and teared were sutured in simple continuous pattern using Polyglactin (e) 910 (Vicryl) (# 1) layer by layer.
The anterior and posterior branches of the obturator nerve, or the common obturator nerve, run between the pectineus and obturator externus muscles immediately after the nerve emerges from the obturator canal (Figure 1(a)).
During cervical roots monitoring, bilateral electrodes were positioned on biceps, triceps, extensor carpi, and abductor pollicis; lumbar roots monitoring was obtained with bilateral electrodes positioned on quadriceps, anterior tibialis, triceps surae, and sphincter ani externus. Spinal roots were stimulated using a bipolar stimulator with impulse administered directly on the root.
The following muscle fascicles were involved in this spine model: 5 transversus, 3 spinalis, 1 rectus abdominis (RA), 58 erector spinae (ES), 38 lumbar multifidus, 24 thoracic multifidus, 12 oblique externus, 12 oblique internus, 22 psoas major, 10 quadratus lumborum, and 18 semispinalis.
In the classically held framework of basal ganglia circuitry, facilitation of movement was felt to be achieved through activation of a direct pathway from striatum to output nuclei (SNr and GPi), while inhibition of movement occurred through excitation of an indirect pathway (through globus pallidus externus and STN) [72]; however, recent advances in modeling of striatonigral-thalamocortical pathways have made it clear that while the classical model of basal ganglia circuitry provides a solid foundation for the understanding of its complex interconnections, it hardly captures its complete intricacies [72].
Behavioral and motor improvement after deep brain stimulation of the globus pallidus externus in a case of Tourette's syndrome.
The inferior lumbar triangle (triangle of Petit) which is an upright triangle and contains three major layers from superficial to deep: Subcutaneous fatty tissue, the abdominis obliquus internus muscle and transversus abdominis muscle and their fascias, is located among the anterior margin of the latissimus dorsi muscle, posterior margin of the abdominis obliquus externus muscle and inferiorly the crista iliaca.
The cuts (with their representative muscles) were: loin (longissimus dorsi muscle from 1st to 13th thoracic vertebrae), strip-loin (longissimus dorsi muscle from 1st to 5th lumbar vertebrae), shoulder-chuck-roll (splenius and ventral serratus muscles), shank (extensor digitorum longus and extensor digitorum pedis lateralis muscles), outside-round (biceps femoris and vastus lateralis muscles), tender-loin (psoas major and psoas minor muscles), shoulder-clod (supraspinatus and triceps brachii muscles), brisket (cranial superficial pectoral and brachiocephalicus muscles), top-round (semimembranosus and semitendinosus muscles) and short-plate-brisket (obliquus externus abdominis, transversus abdominis and rectus abdominis).