extirpate


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extirpate

[′ek·stər‚pāt]
(biology)
To uproot, destroy, make extinct, or exterminate.
References in periodicals archive ?
RAWALPINDI -- Punjab Governor Muhammad Sarwar has said that the upcoming era is the arena of competitive struggles and it is necessary to extirpate the inglorious evils of hunger, famine, maladies, deprivation and destitution.
Meanwhile, the lads off the estates of Leeds, Birmingham, Glasgow, Bristol, South Wales, Newcastle and elsewhere continue to die in a futile attempt to extirpate the Taliban.
Unlike Sabine MacCormack, Religion in the Andes: Vision and Imagination in Early Colonial Peru (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1991) and Kenneth Mills, Idolatry and Its Enemies: Colonial Andean Religion and Extirpation, 1640-1750 (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1997), which rely heavily on records of Spanish attempts to extirpate "idolatry" and "superstition" from the Andes, Ramos's work is based on a close reading of nearly five hundred wills written by indigenous residents of Lima and Cuzco.
Senator Rabbani reiterated that the government would not bow down to the pressure of terrorists and would extirpate the menace with support of the people.
The Pakistani army has carried out operations in Mohmand, but it has been unable to extirpate the militants.
Pay them a right wage, stop the rot, extirpate the bad ones and reward the good ones.'' Extirpate.
Do you not own the same word-a-day calendar as the author and didn't know extirpate means exterminate?
About President Asif Ali Zardari, Karzai said that he was the man, who from the very core of his heart wanted to extirpate terrorism.
Henry VIII's annexation of Wales through the unilateral Act of Union included a pledge to "utterly extirpate" a language described as "sinister".
Where there is, in fact, very high exploitation of bucks, APRs are not going to buy you much and will insure that you extirpate mature males.
In 1788, he introduced a resolution at the Baptists' General Committee meeting in Virginia denouncing slavery as "a violent deprivation of the rights of nature and inconsistent with a republican government" and urging the use of "every legal measure to extirpate this horrid evil from the land."