extirpate

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extirpate

[′ek·stər‚pāt]
(biology)
To uproot, destroy, make extinct, or exterminate.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Due to the morbidity associated with resection of portions of the jaw bones, such extirpative procedures should only be reserved for large, aggressive, lesions involving the inferior border of the mandible and/or extending into the maxillary antrum and/or nasal cavities [11].
(7.) Kayem G, Davy C, Goffinet F, Thomas C, Clement D, Cabrol D: Conservative versus extirpative management in cases of placenta accreta.
Moreover, gossypiboma may be misdiagnosed as a malignant tumor and lead to unnecessary invasive diagnostic procedures or extensive extirpative surgery (as in our case) which may result in further complications (9).
Immediate Gore-Tex sling suspension for management of facial paralysis in head and neck extirpative surgery.
During the study period there were no laid down standard conservative or extirpative protocols for the management of morbidly adherent placenta.
The treatment of germ cell tumours has greatly evolved from extirpative surgery only, to cisplatin-based chemotherapy, radiotherapy and retroperitoneal lymph node dissection.
As this is an extirpative surgery, aside from the usual risks associated with surgery, specific risks of the procedure include increased risk of hypogonadism and infertility and this should be very carefully discussed with the patient and documented.
Regardless of whether conservative or extirpative surgery is being performed, the ability to optimally position the uterus within the pelvis is critical to safe and efficient surgical dissection.
As gynecologists strive to incorporate more minimally invasive options, global endometrial ablation (GEA) technology is now providing an alternative to traditional surgical extirpative management.
(1-4) Puncture may be performed (1) primarily at the time of extirpative surgery or (2) secondarily after wounds have healed).
Whether preceded by a diagnostic fine needle aspiration or not, extirpative surgery is undertaken.