extirpate

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extirpate

[′ek·stər‚pāt]
(biology)
To uproot, destroy, make extinct, or exterminate.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Like the person who organized the building of a first church or who rode in a conquering expedition, the seventeenth-century extirpator on a diligencia participated in a new beginning, a potential triumph in foreign territory.
There were also moments of unease, times when what the extirpator encountered in the Andean landscape was intellectually and practically more cumbersome than the survival of purely Indian religious forms.
Cristobal de Molina and Cristobal de Albornoz, missionaries and early extirpators of idolatry, described Vilcabamba as the new center of Inca religious resurgence and attempted to tie a localized millennialist movement known as Taki Onqoy to the Inca priests of Vilcabamba.
Titu Cusi Yupanqui declares himself a Christian, is baptized, and participates in various Christian ceremonies and Spanish cultural practices, yet his words and deeds recorded in the Instruccion represent "heresies" in relationship to Christian orthodoxy and reveal his so-called apostasy, that is, his return to and continuance of Andean religious and cultural practices the extirpators denounced.
When "extirpators of idolatry" assessed their mission in Peru, they were sobered by their apparently unsuccessful evangelizing campaigns in Spain and the colonies.
For example, Wilson (1971) described three common foraging strategies: "opportunists" typically arrive first at baits but are timid and withdraw in the face of interspecific competition; "extirpators" often take longer to locate baits but recruit in large numbers and aggressively displace other species; lastly, "insinuators" depend on their small size and inconspicuous behavior to collect food while in the presence of other ants.
She examines everything from conquistadors' chronicles, religious manuals written by extirpators of idolatries, and mestizo paintings of the Cuzco School to more recent Marxist, feminist, and chicano novels, autobiographies, and short stories.
Indeed, although regrettably Spitta does not explore ir, some extirpators were accused and tried as heretics by the Inquisition for studying and describing in detail the pagan rituals of natives.