extract

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extract

1. a preparation containing the active principle or concentrated essence of a material
2. Pharmacol a solution of plant or animal tissue containing the active principle

Extract

 

a concentrated medicinal substance obtained from raw materials that contain certain active ingredients, such as glycosides, alkaloids, and vitamins; a type of galenical. Depending on the extracting agent used, extracts may be categorized as, for example, aqueous, alcoholic, or ethereal. Depending on the degree of thickening after evaporation, they may be classified as liquid, semiliquid (no more than 25 percent moisture), or dry (up to 5 percent moisture).

extract

[′ek‚strakt (noun) or ik′strakt (verb)]
(chemistry)
Material separated from liquid or solid mixture by a solvent.
(computer science)
To form a new computer word by extracting and putting together selected segments of given words.
To remove from a computer register or memory all items that meet a specified condition.
(metallurgy)
To separate a metal or a mineral from an ore by various chemical or mechanical methods.
(pharmacology)
A pharmaceutical preparation obtained by dissolving the active constituents of a drug with a suitable menstruum, evaporating the solvent, and adjusting to prescribed standards.
A preparation, usually in a concentrated form, obtained by treating plant or animal tissue with a solvent to remove desired odiferous, flavorful, or nutritive components of the tissue.

extract

To decompress. To restore the original files from a compressed archive (ZIP file, RAR file, etc.). See archive, data compression and archive formats.
References in periodicals archive ?
PHOTO : Figure 9 antioxidant extractability in latex
Martens DC, Chesters G, Peterson LA (1966) Factors controlling the extractability of soil zinc.
Anthocyanin extraction was little affected by ripening stage; free anthocyanins showed similar extractability, while among acylated anthocyanins extractability was markedly lower for coumaroylated and caffeoylated compounds.
Consequently, extractability (the value of the slope coefficient for the relationship between soil test P and the amount of P applied in 2000) tended to decrease with increasing PRI and PBC (Fig.
The c and n coefficients derived from the rescaled Mitscherlich Eqn 1, the P required for 50% and 90% of maximum yield ([P.sub.50%] and [P.sub.90%] derived from data fitted to the rescaled Mitscherlich Eqn 1), and the extractability of soil test P ([P.sub.Extract], B coefficient of linear Eqn 2), were all related to soil properties by simple and multiple linear regression.
For the extractability of exogenous La in soil, an air-dried and sieved (0.28 mm) soil sample was weighed in a plastic test tube, 0.05 M HCl was added to each tube, and the tube was then kept at 25[degrees]C for 24 h and shaken occasionally (Cao and Zhao 1997).
2014), leading to a reduced Al extractability with higher SOM contents.
The impact of heating on the extractability of xanthophylls in egg yolk.
The material is deemed as a part of drug development process while being tested for extractability and leaching, which in turn has spurred adoption of PET containers in the pharmaceutical industry.