extragalactic radio source

extragalactic radio source

[¦ek·strə·gə′lak·tik ′rad·ē·ō ‚sȯrs]
(astrophysics)
A source of radio emission outside the Milky Way.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nearly 30 years later, Howard Bond noticed its equivalence with the extragalactic radio source PKS 1514-24.
The main purpose of the complex is to conduct radiointerferometric observations of extragalactic radio sources (quasars) using geodetic programs.
I will present results from radio polarization observations at cm and meter wavelengths, discussing what they tell us about Galactic ISM, diffuse emission in galaxy clusters and the physical condition in extragalactic radio sources. I will conclude by describing the future perspectives in the light of the new radio telescopes (SKA pathfinders).
Containing over seventy of the conference papers, the book covers topics including low-frequency surveys and cosmology, extragalactic neutral hydrogen and OH, extragalactic radio sources, clusters of galaxies, the Milky Way galaxy, pulsars, transients and high-energy sources, Sun and planetary studies, and instrumentation and techniques.
Bremen, Germany) explain the basics of such topics as special relativity (assuming some familiarity with its ideas), gas and plasma physics, radiation processes for interpreting electromagnetic observations, and extragalactic radio sources. Chapters include equations, illustrations, further reading and Web resources.
Using a similar technique, Michael Faison (a graduate student at the University of Wisconsin) is imaging the distribution of neutral hydrogen in our own galaxy by looking at 21-cm absorption along the line of sight to distant extragalactic radio sources. He has found large fluctuations in gas density on scales of about 10 astronomical units, smaller than the size of our solar system.
These catalogs include well-known classical ones such as the Yale Bright Star Catalog or the General Catalog of Variable Stars, as well as other more specialized ones like the All Sky Catalog of Extragalactic Radio Sources at 2.7 GHz or Optical Positions of 221 Radio Stars.