extraordinary wave


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extraordinary wave

[ik′strȯr·dən‚er·ē ′wāv]
(geophysics)
Magneto-ionic wave component which, when viewed below the ionosphere in the direction of propagation, has clockwise or counterclockwise elliptical polarization respectively, accordingly as the earth's magnetic field has a positive or negative component in the same direction. Also known as X wave.
(optics)
Component of electromagnetic radiation propagating in an anisotropic uniaxial crystal whose electric displacement vector lies in the plane containing the optical axis and the direction normal to the wavefront; it gives rise to the extraordinary ray. Also known as extraordinary compoment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Only the extraordinary wave is studied because the behavior of an ordinary wave is analogous to the case of an isotropic medium.
Takidze, "Spatial power spectrum of multiple scattered ordinary and extraordinary waves in magnetized plasma with electron density fluctuations, " Progress In Electromagnetics Research M, Vol.
It is worth noting that only the extraordinary wave shows this type of tunability with temperature.
where [R.sub.12oe] is the reflection coefficient of reflected extraordinary wave for the ordinary wave incidence from Region 1 to Region 2 and [X.sub.12oe] is the transmission coefficient of the transmitted extraordinary wave for ordinary wave incidence.
ADEFIANT Michael Martin was fighting for his position as Commons Speaker last night in the face of an extraordinary wave of anger over his handling of the MPs' expenses scandal.
Mr Dewar's death triggered an extraordinary wave of mourning across the country not seen since John Smith died in six years ago.
The legal action had appeared beyond their pockets but was paid for thanks to an extraordinary wave of support from thousands of people in Birmingham and across the country - many of them football fans - which boosted the fighting fund.
Having ridden an extraordinary wave of popular acclaim in its early years, its fortunes have now irrevocably turned, to a point where little remaining good can come of its endeavours.

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