extrasolar planet

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extrasolar planet

(eks-tră-soh -ler) See planet.

extrasolar planet

[¦ek·strə¦sō·lər ′plan·ət]
(astronomy)
A planet in orbit about a star other than the sun. Also known as exoplanet.
References in periodicals archive ?
With the new findings, "the era of direct imaging of extrasolar planets is here at last," he says.
Ten years ago, Gaudi wrote his doctoral thesis on a method for calculating the likelihood that extrasolar planets exist.
Veteran planet hunter Michel Mayor of Geneva Observatory announced the discovery on June 16 at a conference in Nantes, France, along with his team's finding of four other extrasolar planets.
Deming is the deputy principal investigator who leads the team that works on the Extrasolar Planet Observations and Characterization (EPOCh) part of Deep Impact's extended mission, called EPOXI.
With the first optical system devoted to extrasolar imaging set to begin surveying the heavens this summer--and with two other systems scheduled to come online by early 2011--astronomers could get their first real image or such a planet within the next three years, and perhaps much sooner.
Bean and his colleagues used a well-honed technique called radial velocity, which has found most of the extrasolar planets detected so far.
In 1992, researchers used a similar method to find the first known extrasolar planets.
Lovis suggests that the next major step in extrasolar planetary research is to observe a Neptune-mass planet passing in front of its parent star.
On May 30, 2009, a Japanese collaboration team led by Norio Narita (National Astronomical Observatory of Japan) used the Subaru Telescope's High Dispersion Spectrograph (HDS) to observe the HAT-P-7 planetary system, which is about 1000 light-years distant from Earth, and found the first evidence of a retrograde orbit of the extrasolar planet HAT-P-7b.
No mention was made in "In the Zone: Extrasolar planet with the potential for life" (SN: 4/28/07, p.
While many amateurs observe or record spectra for fun, as Dale Mais reported in the May issue (page 90), other amateur spectroscopists are collaborating with their professional counterparts in a variety of projects involving unusual stars and even the search for extrasolar planets.
In most cases, extrasolar planets can't be seen directly-the glare of the nearby star is too great-but their influence can be discerned through spectroscopy, which analyzes the energy spectrum of the light coming from the star.