extrasolar planet


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extrasolar planet

(eks-tră-soh -ler) See planet.

extrasolar planet

[¦ek·strə¦sō·lər ′plan·ət]
(astronomy)
A planet in orbit about a star other than the sun. Also known as exoplanet.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kane and his colleagues were able to confirm its extreme eccentricity and the rest of its orbital parameters as part of the Transit Ephemeris Refinement and Monitoring Survey (TERMS), a project led by Kane to detect extrasolar planets as they pass in front of their stars.
But co-author Professor Geoffrey Marcy, from UC Berkeley, who pioneered the search for extrasolar planets in the 1990s, cautioned that just because an Earth-size planet is in the habitable zone, that does not necessarily make it hospitable to life.
They have demonstrated that, by measuring alterations in the speed at which an extrasolar planet floats in front of its starve transit timing duration (TTD)--a moon hunter unambiguously can detect the desired exomoon.
Therefore, it had been assumed that when searching for signs of life on habitable extrasolar planets, the presence of oxygen in the atmosphere could be considered a definitive biomarker.
The new extrasolar planet is too small for telescopes to take a picture of it.
Finding the water molecule in the spectrum of an extrasolar planet would indicate that there is water vapour in its atmosphere, making it likely that any blue patches seen as it rotates were indeed oceans of liquid water.
Only one other extrasolar planet has a density nearly as low as that of HAT-P-1b.
Like other extrasolar planets, it was not observed directly but detected by measuring the way its gravity causes the parent star to wobble.
Because an extrasolar planet never has been directly imaged before, Hubble's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer camera conducted complementary observations taken at shorter infrared wavelength observations unobtainable from the ground.
One, Kepler-7b, has one of the lowest densities--0.17 grams per cubic centimeter--of any known extrasolar planet. That's the same density as Styrofoam, Borucki noted during his talk.
It's one of the ten brightest stars that's currently known to host an extrasolar planet: a body massing at least 1.3 times as much as Jupiter that orbits the brighter star every 424 days.
Washington, June 14 ( ANI ): Researchers has found evidence that an extrasolar planet may be forming quite far from its star-about twice the distance Pluto is from our Sun.