extreme terms

extreme terms

[ek¦strēm ′tərmz]
(mathematics)
The first and last terms in a proportion.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Prosecutor Michael Whitty told Mold Crown Court yesterday: "Chatlogs confirmed that the defendant had been discussing in the most extreme terms about abusing and harming children.
Before 2008, Americans were less likely to rate their dissatisfaction with country's direction in such extreme terms.
If all the Christian peoples of Anatolia label their past with such extreme terms, those times must have been hellish for everyone.
It will agree to nothing save on its own extreme terms.
And also for his own image, because he cannot afford to look like a wimp and would have to respond in very extreme terms.
In addition, even though the governor attacked the Public Employee Choice Act in the most extreme terms, his rhetorical assault at the unions' Labor Day picnic sure beat what took place a few days later in Vancouver, Wash.
But four justices dissented and did so in extreme terms, proclaiming not just the much-disputed individual mandate but the whole act unconstitutional.
But the platform also includes support for repealing birthright citizenship - a polarizing issue that has been linked to extreme terms like "terror babies" and one that Democrats say proves the GOP is pandering.
The North has for months been criticising the South s President Lee Myung-Bak in extreme terms and threatening "sacred war" over perceived insults.
Second, the rise of the cult in the seventeenth century coincided with the Ming-Qing transition, a tumultuous time when virtue, male and female, was often conceptualized in extreme terms.
However, I think Offer rejects the rational choice model too quickly, often characterizing it in extreme terms.
He said: "I remember on many occasions seeing letters which denounced the elected leaders of other countries in extreme terms.

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