extrovert

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extrovert

, extravert Psychol
1. a person concerned more with external reality than inner feelings
2. of or characterized by extroversion
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, the companies weeding out those applicants are likely to significantly limit the pool of job candidates who are extroverts.
Cornell University researchers found that extroverts are more likely to associate the rush of the feel-good brain chemical dopamine with the environment they are in at the time, the New York Daily News reported.
They raked in about 24 percent more in revenue than introverts, and a whopping 32 percent more in revenue than extroverts over the three-month period.
Only one in seven women claim to take the lead as an 'extrovert' or 'instigator of fun'.
"When they are around people all the time and when they go to a party and there's a lot of action, extroverts are energized," says Romano, a self-described introvert who presents at large education conferences.
There's been much debate in popular culture recently about the advantages and disadvantages extroverts have in the workplace, but it often overlooks the scientific literature, a recent study pointed out.
It says "An extrovert sees a stack of books and sees a stack of papers while an introvert looks at the same stack and see a soothing source of escape".
Introverts were more likely than extroverts to rate people as poor roommates if their grammar or spelling was bad - and therefore didn't want to live with them.
They also say that London is the best UK city for extroverts, with a population of 8.8 million.
AVOID EXTROVERT INTERIOR DESIGNERS Those looking to make over their home to enhance their mood should beware of picking a designer who is ultra-outgoing, as energetic extroverts tend to prefer oranges and reds for their living rooms, colours typically associated with negative feelings of tiredness and agitation.
Believe it or not, this is usually an ordeal for early-career extroverts as well.
Proponents of the poor get richer theory (also known as the social compensation hypothesis) argue that, compared to extroverts, introverts use SNSs more frequently because the virtual platforms compensate for their poor social skills in nonvirtual life.