eye of the wind


Also found in: Idioms.

eye of the wind

[′ī əvthə ′wind]
(meteorology)
The point or direction from which the wind is blowing.
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References in classic literature ?
Unable to hang on as close in the eye of the wind as formerly, he proceeded to slack his sheet a trifle and to ease off a bit, in order to outfoot me.
This was their work -- this patient coaxing of a distracted ship over the fury of the waves and into the very eye of the wind. At times Mr.
Grouse Mountain also boasts the world's only observation deck tucked into a wind turbine, aptly called The Eye of the Wind. A stunning 360 degree view is well worth the extra bucks.
As we went through the eye of the wind, I noted the depth had shrunk to 0.3 metres, and held my breath as we went about.
A sky tram ride takes you up 3,700 ft for a morning of stunning views and quirky things to see and do like logging competitions, visiting two adorable grizzly bears Grinder and Coola, and whisk up the Eye of the Wind, a giant windmill, which provides fantastic views of Vancouver and miles around.
Eye of the Wind Jane Jackson (Accent Press, PS7.99) Set in 1795, a year since Lord Roland Stratton left Cornwall for France to undertake a secret mission for the British government.
Tall ships sailed into Liverpool for a weekend of maritime fun called All Aboard, organised by the Liverpool Culture Company as a taster event for 2008 Pictures: ANDREW TEEBAY' A musical pirate at Sandon Dock' Reece Burke, eight, left, from Newsham Park and Matty Millar, seven, from Ormskirk, at the wheel of Eye of the Wind
Ships in Welling-ton/Sandon Dock will be the Christian Rad-dich, considered to be Norway's grandest sailing ambassador' Bessie Ellen, Britain's last wooden coasting ketch still under sail' Swan Fan Makkum, one of the world's largest brigantine and two-masted ships' Eye Of The Wind' Iris, and Le Orla, an Irish naval coastal patrol vessel.
More than 350 kids from primary schools across Middlesbrough performed songs, poems and dances for Eye Of The Wind.
ZONE 2: Catherine, Ireland Scene, Aglaia, Mandalay, Pride of Baltimore II, Bessie Ellen, Peter I, Eye Of The Wind, James Cook, John Lang, Gedania, Greater Manchester, Urania, Victor Jara, Jean De La Lune, Shtandart, Pen Duick, Pen Duick II, Pen Duick III, Tenacious, Christian Radich, Sorlandet, Prince William, Eendracht;
The arrival of Eye of the Wind marks the beginning of the celebrations on Tyneside, four days before the festivities begin.
For instance, it does not explain, as conventional dictionaries do, that the word 'window' comes from old Norse 'vindauga', the 'eye of the wind'.