face time


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face time

(jargon)
Time spent interacting with somebody face-to-face (as opposed to via electronic links). "Oh, yeah, I spent some face time with him at the last Usenix."
References in periodicals archive ?
The 26-year-old defender said: "I didn't get a Face Time, I got a call from him.
Face time takes on many different forms--Q&A sessions, cocktail receptions, dinner parties and, of course, the nonstop ritual of hosted screenings.
Conferences: Schedule meetings and team dinners at conferences to allow more face time for your remote employees.
Technology (e.g., texting) and social media (e.g., Facebook) are methods of connection and communication, similar to and different from face time with another.
Subsequent FACE Time sessions have included more interactive activities with the European-American students in the school.
One important issue that managers have to prioritize is how to handle "face time," or a lack of it, with employees.
It covers Lion's differences, customization options, new features from Face Time to Photo Booth, and offers all keys needed to successfully navigate the entire program.
With your local customer base, I know you realize the value of face time as well.
But nothing's cast in stone yet, because she might lose her Fox face time if she shows up at the Salem rest stop.
Competing with a Wii or Barbie for face time with your kids can be a difficult battle to win.
The online interview trend is slowly gaining steam among co-ops -- where face time prior to a move-in was once mandatory -- due in part to a growing need to work with candidates from outside the city, according to Leslie Lalehzar, a broker with Warburg Realty.
We now have the ability to send and receive messages around the world without ever resorting to face time. In truth, most messaging today doesn't even involve using our voice--just our fingers to type the message.