palsy

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palsy:

see paralysisparalysis
or palsy
, complete loss or impairment of the ability to use voluntary muscles, usually as the result of a disorder of the nervous system. The nervous tissue that is injured may be in the brain, the spinal cord, or in the muscles themselves.
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palsy

[′pȯl·zē]
(medicine)
Any of various special types of paralysis, such as cerebral palsy.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

palsy

Pathol
paralysis, esp of a specified type
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Interestingly, two of the patients with facial nerve palsy were found to have erosion/inflammatory changes involving the horizontal segment of the facial nerve that was discovered either on pre-operative computerized tomography scan or during intraoperative exploration.
Since, there are no indications to perform lumbar puncture in healthy subjects, our reference group consisted of patients with idiopathic headache and idiopathic facial nerve palsy (Bell's palsy).
One patient presented with facial nerve palsy in the postpartum period.
The facial asymmetry due to the facial nerve palsy can be improved through a combination of static and dynamic reanimation procedures.
Thereafter, the right facial nerve palsy improved markedly, and the hearing loss improved gradually.
Although neuroborreliosis is commonly associated with facial nerve palsy it may account for otherwise unexplained neurological manifestations and warrants evaluation with lumbar puncture and CSF studies.
Due to the severe complication of the facial nerve palsy a decision was made for surgical intervention; cortical mastoidectomy with facial nerve decompression and left middle ear exploration was performed.
However, vasoconstriction of the dominant feeder resulted in complete facial nerve palsy, so embolization was not performed.
The most common form of facial nerve palsy is idiopathic facial paralysis.