palsy

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Related to facial palsy: Facial paralysis

palsy:

see paralysisparalysis
or palsy
, complete loss or impairment of the ability to use voluntary muscles, usually as the result of a disorder of the nervous system. The nervous tissue that is injured may be in the brain, the spinal cord, or in the muscles themselves.
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palsy

[′pȯl·zē]
(medicine)
Any of various special types of paralysis, such as cerebral palsy.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

palsy

Pathol
paralysis, esp of a specified type
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
I am hoping people will sign and share a petition which has been set up by Karen Johnson, deputy chief executive officer of the charity Facial Palsy UK.
"Facial palsy profoundly impacts many aspects of a child's life, from functional issues like eating and vision to core psychological issues such as social communication, peer relationships and quality of life," said Kathleen Bogart, one of the researchers.
A PubMed search encompassing all publications over the last 40 years was initially performed searching for "facial palsy OR paralysis OR paresis" AND "stapedectomy OR stapedotomy OR stapes surgery" using Boolean combinations; Further, the terms "delayed OR late" were added to the search.
The charity Facial Palsy UK believes more education is urgently needed about facial paralysis - and says many patients are being let down by delayed diagnosis and insufficient care.
Among the rare neurological complications are Guillain-Barre syndrome, meningoencephalitis, ventriculitis, optic neuritis, delayed contralateral hemiparesis, peripheral motor neuropathy, Reye's syndrome, and facial palsy.2 The incidence of chickenpox in adults has doubled in recent years and this recent shift in age for varicella from childhood to adulthood and adolescence has resulted in increase in complications.1 In a study done on 60 cases with neurological complications due to chicken pox, there were 8.3% patients with facial palsy.3
In this case, the facial palsy was due to a large SCC of the external auditory canal.
Duane retraction anomaly, congenital fibrosis of extraocular muscles, horizontal gaze palsy, congenital ptosis, and congenital facial palsy are the other disorders included in CCDD.
Facial neuroborreliosis can hardly be observed as an independent entity relative to the idiopathic facial palsy (IFP, Bell's palsy).
If some recovery is seen within the first 3 weeks of onset of facial palsy, the prognosis will be favorable.
Moreover, there were no other symptoms of cranial nerve palsy, such as ageusia, facial palsy, reduced facial sensation, loss of gag reflex, and uvular deviation.
Objectives: To evaluate patient satisfaction and outcomes of surgical treatment of eyelid malpositions secondary to facial palsy