profile

(redirected from facial profile)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

profile

1. a view or representation of an object, esp a building, in contour or outline
2. a vertical section of soil from the ground surface to the parent rock showing the different horizons
3. 
a. a vertical section of part of the earth's crust showing the layers of rock
b. a representation of such a section
4. the outline of the shape of a river valley either from source to mouth (long profile) or at right angles to the flow of the river (cross profile)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Profile

An outline of a form or structure seen or represented from the side, or one formed by a vertical plane passed through an object at right angles to one of its main horizontal dimensions.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

profile

[′prō‚fīl]
(geology)
The outline formed by the intersection of the plane of a vertical section and the ground surface. Also known as topographic profile.
Data recorded by a single line of receivers from one shot point in seismic prospecting.
(geophysics)
A graphic representation of the variation of one property, such as gravity, usually as ordinate, with respect to another property, usually linear, such as distance.
(hydrology)
A vertical section of a potentiometric surface, such as a water table.
(petrology)
In structural petrology, a cross section of a homoaxial structure.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

profile

1. A guide used to set out brick work or block work accurately.
3. A vertical section of the surface of the ground, or of underlying strata, or both, along any fixed line. On a highway, the profile is usually taken along the center line.
4. In architectural drawing, the outline of a vertical section.
5. British term for batter board.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

profile

The orthogonal projection of flight path or a portion on the vertical surface containing the nominal track.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

PROFILE

(1)
Simple language for matching and scoring data. "User's Manual for the PROFILE System", Cambridge Computer Assoc (May 1974).

profile

(2)
A control file for a program, especially a text file automatically read from each user's home directory and intended to be easily modified by the user in order to customise the program's behaviour. Used to avoid hard-coded choices (see also dot file, rc file).

profile

(3)
A report on the amounts of time spent in each routine of a program, used to find and tune away the hot spots in it. This sense is often verbed. Some profiling modes report units other than time (such as call counts) and/or report at granularities other than per-routine, but the idea is similar.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

profile

(1) A description of an individual, organization, publication or other entity. See user profile and social networking service.

(2) A list of user preferences. See user profile.

(3) A report of processing time spent within the routines of an executing program in order to figure out how to optimize the code for greater efficiency.

(4) A list of parameters read by a program in order to modify its behavior.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
" Each patient's treatment should be based on specific diagnostic criteria and evaluation of the general consequences on the soft- tissues of the facial profile.
The less aesthetic facial profiles (severely convex and concave) were most prevalent among adolescents with a high household income (P < 0.01), in those whose parents/legal guardians had a high educational level (P = 0.03), in those enrolled in private schools (P < 0.01), and in white adolescents (P = 0.02).
The functional appliance phase was successful in the improvement of the facial profile, reduction of the OJ, OB and the correction of the molar relationship.
The soft tissue measurements used to evaluate the facial profile changes in this study were made using pre and post-treatment lateral cephalometric radiographs taken at the beginning and the end of treatment.
Grizzly Bear Black Bear Round face Oval face Short ears Proportionately longer ears Concave facial profile Straight facial profile Shoulder hump Shoulder hump absent or less pronounced Body slopes downward; Body tilts upward; rump lower than shoulder rump higher than shoulders Long claws Short claws Neck ruff present No neck ruff in spring and fall FAMILIARITY IS THE KEY
A sarcophagus fragment from Grottaferrata showing part of the Indian Triumph of Bacchus was exhibited beside a workshop sheet with studies of the same figures, including a rearing horseman in a pose similar to that of Psyche in the socalled Bed of Polyclitus --toes and facial profile facing 180 degrees in opposite directions (Ambrosiana, inv.
Longitudinal changes in the adult facial profile, American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (1994) 105:464-476.
A size-standardized analysis of soft tissue facial profile during growth.
The skull exhibits typical features of Mazama americana including antlers as simple spikes, less than half the length of the head, a more arched facial profile than in Odocoileus virginiana from El Salvador, and nearly straight upper borders of the orbits (Hall, 1981).
The severity of the skeletal problem, growth pattern, facial profile and patient requirements are important in managing skeletal Class III malocclusions (7).