fact


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fact

1. Law an actual event, happening, etc., as distinguished from its legal consequences. Questions of fact are decided by the jury, questions of law by the court or judge
2. Philosophy a proposition that may be either true or false, as contrasted with an evaluative statement
3. after (or before) the fact Criminal law after (or before) the commission of the offence

FACT

(1)

fact

(artificial intelligence, programming)
The kind of clause used in logic programming which has no subgoals and so is always true (always succeeds). E.g.

wet(water). male(denis).

This is in contrast to a rule which only succeeds if all its subgoals do. Rules usually contain logic variables, facts rarely do, except for oddities like "equal(X,X).".
References in classic literature ?
This will be a great gain - a gain, in fact, of incalculable value.
Jackson had been instantly struck by the fact that Madame Olenska's differences with her grandmother and her other relations were not known to him, and that the old gentleman had drawn his own conclusions as to the reasons for Archer's exclusion from the family councils.
His decision was strengthened by the fact that Nastasia Philipovna had curiously altered of late.
The very fact that the white boy is conscious that, if he fails in life, he will disgrace the whole family record, extending back through many generations, is of tremendous value in helping him to resist temptations.
I did not see him after he ceased to read Dante with me, and in fact I was instructed by the suspicions of my Italian friends to be careful how I consorted with a priest, who might very well be an Austrian spy.
The scientist reasons inductively from the facts of experience.
He hears the commendation, not of himself, but, more sweet, of that character he seeks, in every word that is said concerning character, yea further in every fact and circumstance,--in the running river and the rustling corn.
There is obviously an observable fact called "knowing" such-and-such a thing; examinations are experiments for discovering such facts.
She was so capable, so cheerful in spite of the fact that she was having a hard time.
The speaker's obstinate carriage, square coat, square legs, square shoulders, - nay, his very neckcloth, trained to take him by the throat with an unaccommodating grasp, like a stubborn fact, as it was, - all helped the emphasis.
The lawyers and the judges were very much struck, among other things, by the fact that he had hidden the trinkets and the purse under a stone, without making use of them, and that, what was more, he did not now remember what the trinkets were like, or even how many there were.
If I were writing a novel, rather than narrating such facts as I know of a curious personality, I should have invented much to account for this change of heart.