fact


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fact

1. Law an actual event, happening, etc., as distinguished from its legal consequences. Questions of fact are decided by the jury, questions of law by the court or judge
2. Philosophy a proposition that may be either true or false, as contrasted with an evaluative statement
3. after (or before) the fact Criminal law after (or before) the commission of the offence

FACT

(1)

fact

(artificial intelligence, programming)
The kind of clause used in logic programming which has no subgoals and so is always true (always succeeds). E.g.

wet(water). male(denis).

This is in contrast to a rule which only succeeds if all its subgoals do. Rules usually contain logic variables, facts rarely do, except for oddities like "equal(X,X).".
References in classic literature ?
Every law which the state enacts indicates a fact in human nature; that is all.
It is the spirit and not the fact that is identical.
But it does not follow that the re-examination of a fact once ascertained by a jury, will be permitted in the Supreme Court.
And always he checked them back to facts. "The fact, man, the irrefragable fact!" he would proclaim triumphantly, when he had brought one of them a cropper.
it will supply qualities which the object in question does not in fact have.
In fact, I do not remember that up to the time of going to school I had ever worn any kind of covering upon my head, nor do I recall that either I or anybody else had even thought anything about the need of covering for my head.
The fact was, Totski was at that time a man of fifty years of age; his position was solid and respectable; his place in society had long been firmly fixed upon safe foundations; he loved himself, his personal comforts, and his position better than all the world, as every respectable gentleman should!
Officially, at large gatherings, everyone said that Countess Bezukhova had died of a terrible attack of angina pectoris, but in intimate circles details were mentioned of how the private physician of the Queen of Spain had prescribed small doses of a certain drug to produce a certain effect; but Helene, tortured by the fact that the old count suspected her and that her husband to whom she had written (that wretched, profligate Pierre) had not replied, had suddenly taken a very large dose of the drug, and had died in agony before assistance could be rendered her.
As a matter of fact we see nothing whole, neither life nor art.
He came to the conclusion that the key to the situation was the fact that Elizabeth was American.
'In this life, we want nothing but Facts, sir; nothing but Facts!'
In considering the Origin of Species, it is quite conceivable that a naturalist, reflecting on the mutual affinities of organic beings, on their embryological relations, their geographical distribution, geological succession, and other such facts, might come to the conclusion that each species had not been independently created, but had descended, like varieties, from other species.