factor

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factor,

in arithmetic, any number that divides a given number evenly, i.e., without any remainder. The factors of 12 are 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 12. Similarly in algebra, any one of the algebraic expressions multiplied by another to form a product is a factor of that product, e.g., a+b and ab are factors of a2b 2, since (a+b)(ab)=a2b2. In general, if r is a rootroot,
in mathematics, number or quantity r for which an equation f(r)=0 holds true, where f is some function. If f is a polynomial, r is called a root of f; for example, r=3 and r
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 of a polynomialpolynomial,
mathematical expression which is a finite sum, each term being a constant times a product of one or more variables raised to powers. With only one variable the general form of a polynomial is a0xn+a1x
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 equation f(x)=0, then (xr) is a factor of the polynomial f(x).

factor

[′fak·tər]
(mathematics)
For an integer n, any integer which gives n when multiplied by another integer.
For a polynomial p, any polynomial which gives p when multiplied by another polynomial.
For a graph G, a spanning subgraph of G with at least one edge.
(statistics)
A quantity or a variable being studied in an experiment as a possible cause of variation.

factor

1. Maths
a. one of two or more integers or polynomials whose product is a given integer or polynomial
b. an integer or polynomial that can be exactly divided into another integer or polynomial
2. Med any of several substances that participate in the clotting of blood
3. Law, Commerce a person who acts on another's behalf, esp one who transacts business for another
4. former name for a gene
5. Commercial law a person to whom goods are consigned for sale and who is paid a factorage
6. (in Scotland) the manager of an estate

factor

A quantity which is multiplied by another quantity.

See also divisor.

factor

A number that divides evenly into another number. For example, 3 and 4 are factors of 12. See factorial and IFP.
References in periodicals archive ?
In order to better understand the layers of online stickiness, the data for these activities were first assessed for factorability. First, reliability analysis of these 12 items produced a Cronbach's alpha of .55.
Factorability of the data was supported by a Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin value of .80 as well as Bartlett's test of sphericity reaching statistical significance (p < .01).
The KMO analysis of 0.85 showed that the matrix had high factorability. The K1 analysis (eigenvalue equal to or greater than one) suggested the existence of up to nine components, yet the parallel analysis, calculated by the Monte Carlo PCA software, indicated the existence of, at the most, four components and the segmentation diagram indicated the presence of up to three components.
The Kaiser-Mayer-Olkin (KMO) value was .841, exceeding the recommended value of .6 (Kaiser, 1970), and Bartlett's Test of Sphericity reached statistical significance of X2 (105) = 1278.586, p < .001, supporting the factorability of the correlation matrix.
The factorability of the 16 helping behavior items was examined.
With sound evidence of data factorability, a principal axis factoring followed by oblimin rotation was conducted.
The Kaiser-Meyer-Oklin value was 0.85 and Bartlett's test of sphericity reached statistical significance, supporting the factorability of the correlation matrix.
The Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin (KMO) measure of sampling adequacy and Bartlett's test of sphericity were evaluated for adequacy of the factorability of items.
Principal components extraction was used prior to principal factors extraction to estimate the number of factors, presence of outliers, absence of multicollinearity, and factorability of the correlation matrices.
Bartlett's test of sphericity supported the factorability of the data, and sampling adequacy was supported by Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin (KMO) testing.
In Section 2 it is explained how the study of the factorability of scalar and matrix functions is related to the invertibility of certain classes of singular integral operators and, consequently, to the study of the spectra of singular integral operators.