factoring


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factoring

[′fak·tə·riŋ]
(mathematics)
Finding the factors of an integer or polynomial.
References in periodicals archive ?
Factoring, short-term financing technique appeared two centuries ago as a result of trade between the U.S.
I will use the Wikipedia definition of factoring: a financial transaction whereby a business sells its accounts receivable - invoices - to a third party, called a factor, at a discount in exchange for immediate money with which to finance continued business.
Jeroen Kohnstamm, secretary general of FCI, the primary international factoring body, told the audience, "it's proven that it works, but it's new to Egypt."
The export factor buys the exporter's debts (also called the Adherent) over the importer, in order to later yield them to the factor for import; the international factoring (Caraiani, 2004) must meet one of the following conditions:
The assumed difficulty of factoring large numbers plays a crucial role in the so-called RSA encryption system, which is widely used to safeguard credit card numbers and other information transmitted across the Internet.
While factoring has been around for hundreds of years (Martin Luther's father ran a factoring operation), it found its way to America during the time this country was being settled.
Factoring export receivables also generates a domestic receivable.
factoring companies--including data on size, individual factoring programs, rate structures, industry preferences, contract terms and operating practices.
Factoring's methods continued as they had for decades because they worked so well for so many clients.
Factoring is a financing option for young, undercapitalized businesses that have the profit margins to absorb the factor's fee.
The author of the report was Eugene Olivier Carissan, an officer in the French infantry and amateur mathematician, who had designed the factoring apparatus.
Five creative forms of alternative financing include "factoring," or selling accounts receivables for up-front cash; finding an "angel investor" (a wealthy investor); obtaining loans or credit from suppliers; seeking loans from venture capital firms that cater to small businesses; and joining a susu, where you pool money with friends and family.