FAD

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Related to faddists: faddishness

FAD

FAD

["FAD, A Simple and Powerful Database Language", F. Bancilon et al, Proc 13th Intl Conf on VLDB, Brighton, England, Sep 1987].
References in periodicals archive ?
The disposition on the part of faddists to seek to force their fads down other people's throats through the agency of the State, is one of the worst signs of the times.
John Harrison wrote that all communities had their vegetarians, teetotalers, nonsmokers, and fresh-air-and-cold-water faddists, and it is to be expected that communities dedicated to providing an alternative lifestyle should attract others with their own ideas as to what that life should be.
Arrison is eager not to be confused with various longevity faddists of yore, from Ponce de Leon to Serge Voronoff, who a century ago started a fad for grafting monkey testicles onto those of aging men.
Scurvy has been known to mankind since ages; link with vitamin C was not established until in 1747 Sir James Lind established the fact that oranges and lemons were effective in curing scurvy.1 Later in 1931, Albert Szent- Gyorgyi identified the active substance as ascorbic acid, also known as vitamin C.2 Since the recognition of the role of vitamin C in preventing and treating scurvy, it has been considered as a disease of past, prevalent among sailors and soldiers with limited access to fresh citrus fruits.1,2 However, recognition of many new cases3,4,5 and identification of several risk factors6,7 (food faddists, chemotherapy patients, anorexia nervosa, major depression disorder, alcohol abuse, etc.), not so uncommon in the modern world, have renewed interest in scurvy.
(201-02) Moreover, McWilliams notes, there are specifically identifiable reasons for the transformation of people who previously worshipped in relatively orthodox ways into experimenters and faddists:
She does not describe the customers but does say that she preferred the appearance of people who 'cheerfully and persistently in the face of all food faddists still consume three meat meals a day.
These are trial sufficient, but to the half-mad self-absorption of exercise faddists I prefer even environmental fanatics of the Al Gore variety, though these, in their obnoxious superiority, vie with the God-is-dead crowd.
Gregory's book links up with the literature on (for example) secularism, spiritualism, dress reform, birth control, the 'simple life', sexuality and theosophy (he has also written on Victorian 'eccentricity'), as well as connecting with more prosaic debates on diet and living standards in Victorian England, and prompting speculation on the psychology of 'faddists' and health reformers as personality types, and their relationship with broader reforming political cultures.
For instance, 'Anti-Meddling' protested against the sanctity of the home being invaded by "the machinations of eugenicists, hygienists and all other varieties of faddists", and in the belief that mothers instinctively knew best noted that "the well-meaning busybodies who profess to be so concerned about the care of babies" were mostly childless themselves.
The anti-drink brigade and the food faddists won't like it of course.