fading

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fading

[′fād·iŋ]
(communications)
Variations in the field strength of a radio signal that are caused by changes in the transmission medium.
(graphic arts)
The loss of density on a photographic image.
(textiles)
A change in the color of a fabric produced by a natural or artificial agent, such as sunlight or an abrasive.

Fading

The effect caused by excessive exposure to sunlight or weathering, usually in terms of color or luster.

fading

The loss of color of a paint film through exposure to sunlight and weather.

fading

i. The variation of radio field strength caused by changes in the strength of the transmission medium's signal.
ii. The decrease in the amount of braking because of either overheating after prolonged and continuous or harsh braking or internal leakages in the system.
References in periodicals archive ?
To the best of our knowledge, the effects of the no wireless radio fading models other than the Rayleigh distribution have been considered in the performance of the adaptive networks [1]-[4], while it is a very important issue.
The fading channel coefficients can be produced by Rician or Rayleigh distributions, based on the existence or the absence of the specular signal component or the line of sight [10-11].
In [10-11], it is mentioned that if there is a main LOS path in the communication link between transmitter and receiver, then the fading can be modeled as Rician.
Spalevic, Fading and Interference Mitigation in Wireless Communications, USA: CRC Press, 2013.
Develi, "Performance of two-hop DS-CDMA systems using amplify-and-forward protocol over different fading channels", Elektronika ir Elektrotechnika, vol 22, no 1, pp.
Paris, "Statistical characterization of Kappa -Mu shadowed fading", IEEE T.
The random matrix [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] captures small-scale fading, whose elements are modeled as independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.) CN 0,1 random variables (RVs).
The diagonal matrix [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] captures large-scale fading, which includes shadowing fading and path loss.
The shadowing fading is captured by coefficient [[xi].sub.m], which is modeled as a Gamma RV.
Figure 3 shows the distribution of annual received signal strength fading that was influenced by rainfall.
Presented received signal fading on figures is shown only for events when the signal level drops off less than -50 dBm though the receiver threshold level was -69 dBm.
After processing the great quantity of the data obtained from links and HMS we took the view that fading because of the multipath propagation in rainless days was unrelated with HMS observational weather parameters such as: weather temperature, dew point temperature, water vapour pressure, relative humidity, weather pressure et al., that are measured in weather stations on the ground and at one point at 10 m above the earth surface.