fair line

fair line

[¦fer ′līn]
(naval architecture)
A line formed by the intersection of a plane with a ship's surface, which surface is smooth and is such as to minimize resistance to the ship's motion.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Supporters and opponents of the book fair line up for the battle long before its opening every year.
Willie Mullins will have a fair line to the form of the race through his runner-up Simenon, who would probably fall short of being good enough to join his Cheltenham team.
When the Canadian constitution was amended in 1958 to require judges to leave the bench at seventy-five, that age was widely accepted as a fair line to draw between competence and senility.
"I think that's a fair line," said Woodward when the "don't know how to lose" quote was thrown at him.
Hundreds of engineering companies across the West Midlands have been urged to take a firm but fair line on employees who succumb to World Cup fever.
A ball is fair when it goes over 3rd base or 1st base fair or a ball that hits inside the fair line.
Through EBCO, Johnson has also had success internationally with his Fashion Fair line of cosmetics sold in over 2,500 stores in the U.S., Canada, Europe, Africa and the Caribbean.
Al Wehren, owner of Fair Line Marine and the primary local bidder, agrees.
The courts should take a fair line when deciding custody cases.
He added that he believed the EU's reaction to the outbreak so far had been "reasonable and proportionate" and he urged it to continue to take a fair line towards British farmers.
But as long as you have your health and an illegal bookmaker who doesn't mind giving out a fair line of credit, life is not so bad.
Captain Aubrey (7.50 Towcester)Stable has a fair line on bumper form and he is ready to build on two promising efforts in similar company.Other to followTowcester: 5.50 Physical Graffiti.
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