fair wind

fair wind

[¦fer ′wind]
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References in classic literature ?
There they are, down there every night at eight bells, praying for fair winds--when they know as well as I do that this is the only ship going east this time of the year, but there's a thousand coming west--what's a fair wind for us is a head wind to them--the Almighty's blowing a fair wind for a thousand vessels, and this tribe wants him to turn it clear around so as to accommodate one--and she a steamship at that
The spell of the fair wind has a subtle power to scatter a white-winged company of ships looking all the same way, each with its white fillet of tumbling foam under the bow.
Ah, he only who knoweth WHITHER he saileth, knoweth what wind is good, and a fair wind for him.
It was one of those less lowering, but still grey and gloomy enough mornings of the transition, when with a fair wind the ship was rushing through the water with a vindictive sort of leaping and melancholy rapidity, that as I mounted to the deck at the call of the forenoon watch, so soon as I levelled my glance towards the taffrail, foreboding shivers ran over me.
The gale that now hammers at us to stave us, we can turn it into a fair wind that will drive us towards home.
Give a fair wind and sight of safe return to the shipmen who speed and govern this ship.
As the schooner paid off, the fore- and main-sheets were slacked away for fair wind.
Grimaud tendered twenty guineas to the captain, and at nine o'clock in the morning, having a fair wind, our Frenchmen set foot on their native land.
And so it was that when the first fair wind rose he embarked upon his cruise, and with him he took as strange and fearsome a crew as ever sailed under a savage master.
Here's luck," "A fair wind," and "Billy Bones his fancy," were very neatly and clearly executed on the forearm; and up near the shoulder there was a sketch of a gallows and a man hanging from it--done, as I thought, with great spirit.
I communicated to his majesty a project I had formed of seizing the enemy's whole fleet; which, as our scouts assured us, lay at anchor in the harbour, ready to sail with the first fair wind.
Now off Egypt, about as far as a ship can sail in a day with a good stiff breeze behind her, there is an island called Pharos--it has a good harbour from which vessels can get out into open sea when they have taken in water--and here the gods becalmed me twenty days without so much as a breath of fair wind to help me forward.