scareware

(redirected from fake antivirus)

scareware

A warning message that pops up from a website that claims the user's computer is currently contaminated or not running properly. Also called "fake antivirus" and "rogue antivirus," scareware is a dishonest attempt to cause a user to purchase antivirus, registry cleaner or some other software that repairs problems or enhances performance.

Worse yet, scareware may be used to entice the user to install phony software that implants a real virus or some other malware. In either case, the dire warning frightens people into taking action. See ransomware, spyware and wares.
References in periodicals archive ?
Past studies have confirmed that hackers use fake antivirus apps to fool unassuming users into downloading malware to their devices.
Internet fraud, where pop-up browsers can fool seniors into either downloading a fake antivirus program (for a fee) or a real virus that will steal their personal data and/or take control of their computer.
Some slow your computer's performance and trigger phony security alerts, followed by pop-up offers to sell you fake antivirus protection--what Is known as scareware.
It comes disguised as a fake antivirus (AV) application prompting the end-user to pay for a full subscription of the AV after performing a fake scan and showing a list of hardcoded "infections" found on the phone.
According to McAfee's Threats Report Fourth Quarter 2012, the company's labs saw an extremely rapid growth in mobile malware and a steady increase in general malware, including fake antivirus and signed malware.
The onset of this trend dates back to 2012 when Fake antivirus and Flashback - that disguised itself as fake adobe Flash installer - made news.
Research-and-development organizations also exist for creating custom-ordered code, fake antivirus software, ransom-ware, deployment systems and exploit code.
Like most fake antivirus programs, Smart Security will show constant error messages and viruses warnings.
Fake antivirus has begun to fade as a criminal enterprise, and a new and harsher model has emerged: ransomware -- which infects a computer system and restricts access until a ransom is paid to the creator of the malware.
"Established sites like Facebook and Twitter have long been a breeding ground for new cyber-attacks, but now we are seeing stammers taking an interest in the popularity of newer sites like Pinterest in order to catch victims off guard and trick them into clicking on something they shouldn't" Twitter users were the quarry of cybercriminals looking to distribute fake antivirus applications during a particularly vicious spam run, which tweeted a link labeled "must-see" from numerous compromised accounts and spam-bots.