fallacy

(redirected from fallacies)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to fallacies: Logical fallacies

fallacy,

in logic, a term used to characterize an invalid argument. Strictly speaking, it refers only to the transition from a set of premises to a conclusion, and is distinguished from falsity, a value attributed to a single statement. The laws of syllogisms were systematically elaborated by Aristotle, and for an argument to be valid, it must adhere to all the laws; to be fallacious, it need only break one (see syllogismsyllogism,
a mode of argument that forms the core of the body of Western logical thought. Aristotle defined syllogistic logic, and his formulations were thought to be the final word in logic; they underwent only minor revisions in the subsequent 2,200 years.
..... Click the link for more information.
). The term fallacy has come to be used in a somewhat wider sense than the purely formal one. Informal fallacies are said to occur when statements are ambiguous or vague as to the logical form they represent, or when a multiplicity of meaning is present and the validity of the argument depends on switching meanings of a word or a phrase in midstream.

fallacy

Logic an error in reasoning that renders an argument logically invalid
References in periodicals archive ?
He even had to invent a couple of logical fallacies to lay at our doors.
They strongly rejected the fallacies broadcast by Al-Jazeera TV channel, noting that the the so-called documentary, 'The Hidden Is Immense'and other programmes are part of the regime-run Al-Jazeera's conspiracies against Bahrain and the region.
In "Give Them an Argument: Logic for the Left", Burgis arms his reader with the essential knowledge of formal logic and informal fallacies that will be required for any political discussion in this polarized times.
There are many urban legends and ecological fallacies about our profession that merit our attention.
Logical fallacies giving rise to the expression "a false analogy" include: The compared cases are not alike in their essential characteristics; the characteristics are not accurately described; or the proposed analogy is a figurative analogy, not a logical one.
The inclusion of such subjects can be empowering for the students to counter the illogicality and falsehood in the use of language so they cannot be subjugated by fallacies in the language.
Four fallacies underline these common political arguments.
Many of us are familiar with fallacies or deceptive arguments such as argumentum ad hominem (appeal to the person), ad misericordiam (to pity), ad verecundiam (to authority), and others.
Why Brilliant People Believe Nonsense is a comprehensive look at numerous logical fallacies and stumbling blocks that introduce and perpetuate false beliefs in people.
Summary: In 1809, Jeremy Bentham, the founder of utilitarianism, set to work on "The Book of Fallacies."
Both fallacies have been previously documented independently in the field among lottery players.
Aiming to show students how to play a role in reducing crime, the authors offer the fundamentals for thinking about crime, show how to overcome popular fallacies about crime, and focus on criminal acts in a more specific way, emphasizing modus operandi and crime prevention.