falling body

falling body

[′fȯl·iŋ ′bäd·ē]
(mechanics)
A body whose motion is accelerated toward the center of the earth by the force of gravity, other forces acting on it being negligible by comparison.
References in classic literature ?
The French army pushed on to Moscow, its goal, its impetus ever increasing as it neared its aim, just as the velocity of a falling body increases as it approaches the earth.
The mighty tusker turned at the sound of his falling body, and, seeing only the easy prey of a young ape, he lowered his head and charged madly at the surprised youth.
But when the descending foot missed the solid flooring and felt vacancy beneath, it was the old Wolf Larsen and the tiger muscles that made the falling body spring across the opening, even as it fell, so that he struck on his chest and stomach, with arms outstretched, on the floor of the opposite side.
Then she heard footsteps running rapidly toward Smith-Oldwick and, as his pistol spoke, there was a scream and the sound of a falling body.
His falling body came near to tearing me from the frail hold that my single free hand had upon the anchor chain and plunging me with him to the waters of the sea below.
But, even as he spoke, his voice died away in the receiver to a gurgling sob, and I heard faintly the crash of a falling body.
Then it was that Sheldon struck out, coolly and deliberately, with all the strength of his arm, and Tudor, caught on the jaw, fell sideways, crumpling as he did so and crushing a chair to kindling wood beneath the weight of his falling body.
There was a single crack of his rifle, and, though we saw nothing, we heard the scream and then the distant thud of the falling body.
She discusses Sigmund Freud's theory of trauma in Beyond the Pleasure Principle and Moses and Monotheism; the concept of reference and the figure of the falling body in Paul de Man, Heinrich von Kleist, and Immanuel Kant; the narratives of personal catastrophe in Marguerite Duras and Alain Resnais' Hiroshima mon amour; and Jacques Lacan's rethinking of trauma in his interpretation of Freud's texts.
It is usually assumed that the free falling observer actually reaches the singularity in a finite time, and the infinite-lasting collapse measured by the external observer is justified in the following way: the free falling body has already reached the central singularity, but as the light emitted from the body inside the black hole never escapes from it, we cannot see it falling; furthermore, the light emitted near the event horizon of the black hole comes to us with a great delay, making us believe that it is still falling.
Aristotle had examined bodies in motion, and, evidently noting the way objects fall in water, concluded quite plausibly that the speed of a falling body is uniform, proportional to its weight and would be infinite in the absence of a resisting medium.