fallout shelter


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fallout shelter

[′fȯl‚au̇t ‚shel·tər]
(civil engineering)
A structure that affords some protection against fallout radiation and other effects of nuclear explosion; maximum protection is in reinforced concrete shelters below the ground. Also known as radiation shelter.

fallout shelter

A structure (or room therein) used for protection against harmful radiation due to radioactive fallout following a nuclear blast.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fallout, Fallout Shelter, Nuka Cola and related logos are registered trademarks or trademarks of Bethesda Softworks LLC in the United States and/or in other countries.
Nelson Rockefeller attempted to pass legislation that would have made it mandatory for every existing structure in the state of NewYork to add a fallout shelter by 1963.
Interview with Kirk Paradise: a fallout shelter program for the 21st century.
I remember seeing the black and yellow nuclear fallout shelter signs on schools and government buildings.
The volume closes with a look at two American plays about the `private fallout shelter dilemma' and a gleaning of allusions to `a post-holocaust shelter situation' (p.
ONE NATION UNDERGROUND: The Fallout Shelter in American Culture by Kenneth D.
The idea was to use the doors as a fallout shelter over the hole and to not leave it for 30 days till the radiation had cleared.
The most salient and affecting use of the incident might still be as the backdrop to Joe Dante's Matinee (1993), which conjoins imminent nuclear rain, William Castle-type monster movies, and Florida teenagers discovering first love in a fallout shelter.
Buried beneath virtually the whole of the 19 000 square metre site are three storage levels, parking for 271 cars and a nuclear fallout shelter for employees.
You are a member of a civil defense committee appointed by the president to make decisions on fallout shelter occupancy.
The basic conditions FEMA expects to occur in a fallout shelter are as follows:
GOVERNMENT MISLED ITSELF AND ITS PEOPLE INTO BELIEVING THEY COULD SURVIVE A NUCLEAR ATTACK offers analysis and realities of America's family fallout shelter obsession during the Cold War, charting the evolution of the shelter's concept and its change from a well-stocked basement to a home addition.