false acceptance

false acceptance

[¦fȯls ak′sep·təns]
(statistics)
Accepting on the basis of a statistical test a hypothesis which is wrong.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Cost-effectiveness and Accuracy of Vein Recognition Biometrics to Uphold Market Growth Vein recognition biometrics are relatively more efficient and accurate than the other types of biometric systems and exhibit lower False Acceptance Rate (FAR) and False Rejection Rate (FRR) which is a vital reason behind the surge in the demand for these systems.
By Authentication Type, 1: N authentication type dominated the Indian face matching and authentication software Market in 2018 and is also expected to be the fastest growing authentication type during the forecast period owing to the ongoing enhancement of software to increase the accuracy rate, i.e., reduce false acceptance rate (FAR) and false rejection rate (FRR).
This threshold affects the system's False Acceptance Rate (FAR) and False
The solution quickly and securely authenticates users within 0.6s at a false acceptance rate of below 1/1,000,000.
Another test was done to check the performance of proposed method; it was evaluated by calculating false acceptance rate (FAR) as well false reject rate (FRR) for scenario, original extracted and decapsulated templates.
The false acceptance rate of fingerprint recognition is 1/50,000, while the false acceptance rate of 3D face recognition is 1/1,000,000.
So, post processing (Kumar et al., 2011 and Sahu et al., 2016) was performed to remove such points to reduce False acceptance rate (FAR) and False rejection rate (FRR) of an image.
The fingerprint sensors deliver a proven, secure and convenient user experience with outstanding false rejection rate (FRR) and false acceptance rate (FAR) performance.
In particular, iris, through a touchless solution, also provides a superior false acceptance rate over both fingerprint and facial recognition and is highly desirable throughout all healthcare-related environments, the company said in a written statement.
The inside-the-screen tech has a rejection rate of about 2 percent, and a false acceptance rate of 1 in 50,000, both typical for the industry.
The trial will use UR's visible light palm authentication, using both palm print and vein patterns, which has the world's highest level of accuracy at only 1 in 100 billion false acceptance rate (see note below).