false proscenium

false proscenium

A frame, on stage, directly behind the proscenium arch; used to expose a smaller stage area.
References in periodicals archive ?
These will be HIGHLIGHTS of include a UK The Prince of the 1), with scenery Horse designer Peter Wright's Christmas (and all time will run in the used to create a false proscenium arch, a black frame downstage.
We framed the stage with a lavish, gilded false proscenium that represents the theatre of Brecht's time; but the set within the proscenium was cold and angular, made of industrial steel.
Even when the false proscenium had been whisked away in a stunningly fluid scene change, the idea of the frame lingered in the form of the enormous, golden makeup mirror that dominated Kean's onstage dressing room.
Instead of using an over-the-top budget to create a glamorous palace, designer David Parley reconfigures the space to create a drag club complete with false proscenium.
Vaes has designed a sepia-tinged decor--an ill-rendered false proscenium of Neapolitan (?
Then there's Carl Sprague's false proscenium set, be yond which many of the characters sit as if they were at court watching a play, only to leave their seats to live their faux lives onstage.
The new set, which is built to the dimensions of an average midtown venue and comes with a false proscenium, "will make the experience very similar to being in a Broadway theater.
Nathan Heverin's set encloses the play in a false proscenium with "Homo Sapien" (get it?
Installing a false proscenium here, he's radically reduced the size of the stage at the Theater at St.
Neil Patel's minimalist set suggests what Moliere and his company might have used on tour: a raised wooden platform backed by a picture frame, false proscenium and a wall with two doors.
Jane Greenwood's lavish, over-the-top costumes and Andrew Jackness' sets -- from flickering Comedie Francaise footlights and false proscenium to an elevating platform and a trio of ballroom chandeliers -- glow with a newly minted band-box freshness that presents the musical in the best possible light.
The setup here is that the audience is attending a night of English vaudeville-style entertainment at the Empire Music Hall in Bromly (sic) during the year 1904, complete with a master of ceremonies, painted backdrops, an opening musical number, a false proscenium and the other accouterments of the genre.