false ring

false ring

[¦fȯls ′riŋ]
(botany)
A layer of wood that is less than a full season's growth and often does not form a complete ring.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
False ring occurrence is unlikely, as rings correlate well with climate and among individuals across a population (Dee and Palmer, 2017).
False ring percentages in the majority of Pinus oocarpa growth years.
Precipitation and temperature climograms for different years (left) and annual growths of Pinus oocarpa (right) that show the characteristic false rings formation in the most years as a response to a decrease in humidity conditions and an increase in temperature at the beginning of the growing season (right).
But Independence Day these days, at least since the inauguration of President Duterte, has a hollow, false ring to it.
"Ring out the old, ring in the new, the year is going, let him go, ring out the false ring in the true."
294) speaks of a "false ring foot with ring indented on the bottom," but only C-1934-949 preserves any of the underside, and even here not enough remains to be sure of the form.
Even the models and assumptions handed to us in school, the workplace, and our communities seem to have a false ring. But we don't know how to proceed.
False ring formation in teak (Tectona grandis L.f.) and the influence of environmental factors.
In spite of the overall good ring definition, narrow and faint rings were observed, particularly in the outer sapwood region, suggesting the presence of wedging or false rings. The occurrence of false rings and the indistinctiveness of sapwood rings were also reported in teak from India (Kumar et al.
A dendrochronologist must be able to read micro-rings just two cells wide, false rings embedded in a single annual ring, fuzzy ring boundaries in tropical trees, missing rings, pinched rings that are missing part of their circumference, frost rings formed from freezing temperatures during the growing season, and fire scars that lack telltale charcoal.
The sanding is important, she says, because scientists occasionally see "false rings" (an extra ring put on if a tree has gone into dormancy during a drought, then resumed growth after rain later in the year) and/or missing rings (no ring in the cored area during a particularly dry year).