fanfare


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fanfare

a flourish or short tune played on brass instruments, used as a military signal, at a ceremonial event, etc.

Fanfare

 

a ceremonial or military trumpet-sounding, normally consisting of major triads. They also appear in symphonic and operatic music, as in Beethoven’s Fidelio and Leonore overtures nos. 2 and 3, in Verdi’s Aїda, where special instruments are called for, and in Tchaikovsky’s Capriccio italien. Two-part fan fares make wide use of an ascending progression with intervals of a sixth, a fifth, and a third. Fanfares may also be short pieces for trumpets and kettledrums, for trumpets, French horns, and trom bones, or for other instrumental combinations.

References in periodicals archive ?
Flight Lieutenant Ian Crewe, the squadron's commanding officer, said: "The fanfare section did a brilliant job and it was an excellent opportunity for them to play for such an important civic occasion in this wonderful church.
Fanfare still carries on; at present this august magazine is in its thirtieth year of publication--although, in my opinion, things just are not the same when it comes to film music reviews.
Goossen soon had commissioned 18 men to write 18 fanfares.
How like Gloria to retire modestly, without fanfare or bombast.
The members of the Royal Netherlands Army Fanfare Band provided musical support for the ceremony.
More fanfare followed, in the form of tribute after tribute to the maestro (including from his wife, the lovely Stephanie Sundine), and guests also enjoyed a parade of Youth Opera singers modeling costumes from past productions.
Copland, Aaron: Third Symphony, Appalachian Spring, Fanfare For the Common Man.
com is launched, to much fanfare and celebrity support.
FANFARE looks a tremendous wager in the Turf Club Rated Stakes (4.
His refusal to linger turned the allegretto's folk melody into a quick march, into an eventual battle set off by a toy-town trumpet fanfare.
sponsored by Religious Right figure William Murray and accompanied by several gospel choirs, Istook presented his so-called "Religious Freedom Amendment" to significant fanfare.
Much fanfare has greeted drugs touted as balms for depression, such as fluoxetine (Prozac).