Cabomba

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Related to fanwort: Cabomba caroliniana

Cabomba

 

a genus of aquatic plants of the family Cabom-baceae, formerly included in the Nymphaeaceae family. These plants are perennial grasses with creeping rootstock. The alternate, long-petioled leaves are submerged (finely dissected) and floating (entire, peltate, and leathery). The flowers are solitary and on long peduncles. There are three sepals, three petals, and three to six stamens. The fruit is three-seeded. Around seven species are found in tropical and subtropical America. Several species, including C. aquatica and C. rosifolia, are cultivated in aquariums. Plants of this genus are propagated with pieces of rhizome.

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He said "target species" include invasive milfoil, water lilies and algae in 95-acre Eddy Pond and fanwort, watermeal, bladderwort, duckweed, watershield and algae in 45-acre Pondville Pond.
WESTMINSTER - Milfoil, bladderwort and fanwort - aquatic weeds with names that sound as if they come straight out of the Harry Potter series - are nuisances that people living on Wyman Pond have spent many thousands of dollars over the past five years to try to get rid of.
Pula said the power washing of boat hulls and trailers, the flushing of outboard motors, live wells and bilges with scalding water provided a further guarantee the reservoir would not be inadvertently populated with other invasive species, including the spiny water flea, Eurasian milfoil, water chestnut and fanwort.
Lyman said that he had requested a small increase in funds for next year's deweeding so that he can remove cabomba, commonly known as fanwort, an invasive species.
Invasive weeds, including exotic species not native to New England that have invaded Sturbridge, include Eurasian water milfoil, fanwort, curly pond weed and water chestnut.
SUTTON - Fanwort and milfoil might sound like characters from a children's fantasy novel, but the underwater weeds have been posing a threat to recreational activities on Lake Singletary.