farrier


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farrier

Chiefly Brit
1. a person who shoes horses
2. Archaic another name for veterinary surgeon
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in classic literature ?
The farrier looked at the landlord, and the landlord looked at the butcher, as the person who must take the responsibility of answering.
"Then you needn't tell me who you bought it of," said the farrier, looking round with some triumph; "I know who it is has got the red Durhams o' this country-side.
"I knew that very well," said the farrier, throwing himself backward again, and speaking defiantly; "if I don't know Mr.
The farrier looked fierce, and the mild butcher's conversational spirit was roused a little.
"Well, it's the cow as I drenched, whatever it is," pursued the farrier, angrily; "and it was Mr.
"No," said the farrier, with bitter sarcasm, looking at the company generally; "and p'rhaps you aren't pig-headed; and p'rhaps you didn't say the cow was a red Durham; and p'rhaps you didn't say she'd got a star on her brow--stick to that, now you're at it."
"Judged!" repeated the farrier, swinging his hammer.
The farrier struck a blow upon them with his hammer, and the crowd groaned; but, no more was done.
He saw the thin lines of smoke from the chimneys of each household, and the more copious outpourings from the forges of the van-builder, the blacksmith, and the farrier. At length, at the very end of the village towards which his guide was taking him, Genestas beheld scattered farms and well-tilled fields and plantations of trees in thorough order.
He sets his kingdom up to the best bidder, like some scullion farrier selling a glandered horse.
Within the great enclosure thrived a fair sized town, for, with his ten hundred fighting-men, the Outlaw of Torn required many squires, lackeys, cooks, scullions, armorers, smithies, farriers, hostlers and the like to care for the wants of his little army.
Queue-en-Brie was a very insipid place to stay at then, a village of farriers, and cow-girls with chapped hands, a long line of poor dwellings and thatched cottages, which borders the grand road on both sides for half a league; a tail (queue), in short, as its name imports.