fascia


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Related to fascia: Colles fascia

fascia

(făsh`ēə), fibrous tissue network located between the skin and the underlying structure of muscle and bone. Fascia is composed of two layers, a superficial layer and a deep layer. Superficial fascia is attached to the skin and is composed of connective tissue containing varying quantities of fat. It is especially dense in the scalp, the back of the neck, and the palms of the hands, where it serves to anchor the skin firmly to underlying tissues. In other areas of the body it is loose and the skin may be moved freely back and forth. Deep fascia underlies the superficial layers, to which it is loosely joined by fibrous strands. It is thin but strong and densely packed, and serves to cover the muscles and to partition them into groups.

Fascia

A broad horizontal member or molding with nominal thickness, projecting from the wall.

Fascia

 

an architectural element in the form of a rectangular projection. Fasciae are seen at the base of columns and as part of cornices. They are not always only decorative elements. A fascia may be used to support the cross pieces forming the icon shelf of an iconostasis or to protect a wall from water seepage. In the latter case, the fascia usually slopes away from the wall, forming a stone drip.


Fascia

 

the connective tissue investing organs, vessels, and nerves and forming the sheaths of muscles in man and other vertebrate animals; it performs supporting and trophic functions.

Superficial, or subcutaneous, fasciae are located under a fatty subcutaneous layer; in man, fasciae under the skin of the sole and the palm and under the scalp form aponeuroses. Deep fasciae invest individual muscles or muscle groups. Outgrowths of deep fasciae form intermuscular barriers, which may serve as points of muscle termination and attachment. In many parts of the body, especially in the extremities, the fascial system acts as a spring. When muscles contract, the fasciae shift their position, compressing or relaxing the neural and vascular sheaths, thus facilitating the flow of blood toward the heart. Some fasciae, such as the endothoracic fascia, line internal cavities. Fasciae are richly supplied with blood vessels and nerves.

fascia

[′fā·shə]
(building construction)
A wide board fixed vertically on edge to the rafter ends or wall which carries the gutter around the eaves of a roof.
(histology)
Layers of areolar connective tissue under the skin and between muscles, nerves, and blood vessels.

fascia, facia

1. Any flat horizontal member or molding with little projection, as the bands into which the architraves of Ionic and Corinthian entablatures are divided.
2. Any relatively narrow vertical surface (but broader than a fillet) which is projected or cantilevered or supported on columns or element other than a wall below. Also see platband.

fascia

, facia
1. the flat surface above a shop window
2. Architect a flat band or surface, esp a part of an architrave or cornice
3. Anatomy fibrous connective tissue occurring in sheets beneath the surface of the skin and between muscles and groups of muscles
4. Biology a distinctive band of colour, as on an insect or plant
5. Brit a less common name for dashboard
References in periodicals archive ?
Fascia can actually be classified into four types, each with different properties, functions, and characteristics.
The significance of this anatomy is that the vast majority of afferent information to the brain is providing feedback about pressure and sheer force within the collagen fibrils of fascia. This would include tendon, ligament, enthesis, muscle, and even the bladder wall.
When asked by John Cooper, defending William Hill, if the fitter had no responsibility for the structure below, he added: "Yes, just the fascia, not the structure itself."
One of the possible risk factors of failed tympanoplasty is persistent negative middle ear pressure, in which fascia and perichondrium grafting might not be sufficiently robust.
The lower limb fascia consists of superficial fascia, which lies deep to the skin and contains loose CT that contains fat, cutaneous nerves, superficial veins (greater and lesser saphenous veins), lymphatic vessels, and lymph nodes.
Robert Schleip, a renowned researcher of fascia, Divo Mueller has developed new exercises for people who have rather weak connective tissue.
The endopelvic fascia is a heterogeneous network of collagen, elastin, nerves, lymph channels, and nonvascular smooth muscle fibres [34] extending from the pubic symphysis to the sacrum and the ischial spine.
If you're making two shelves, you'll need the following materials: 4 x long pieces of 25 x 50mm prepared wood to the width of the alcove; 4 x short pieces of 25 x 50mm prepared wood to the depth of the alcove, minus the depth of the front and back pieces of wood, and the fascia if you're having one; 2 x rectangular pieces of MDF to be your shelves; 2 x long pieces of 13mm x 70mm prepared wood for your fascia.
Actualmente esta admitido que el mecanismo etiologico mas aceptado de la FP es la consecuencia de microtraumas de repeticion en la insercion de la fascia, siendo mas probable con mayor edad, ya que a partir de los 40 anos la capa de grasa que recubre el calcaneo empieza un proceso de atrofia y deshidratacion, junto con una perdida de colageno y tejido elastico, con lo que la capacidad de absorber los impactos es menor (5-8).
The two most common sources of graft material are the abdominus rectus fascia and fascia lata harvested from the lateral thigh.
KEYWORDS: Fascia Lata Sling, Interpalpebral Fissure Height, Ptosis.