graft

(redirected from fascia graft)
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graft,

in surgery: see transplantation, medicaltransplantation, medical,
surgical procedure by which a tissue or organ is removed and replaced by a corresponding part, usually from another part of the body or from another individual.
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graft

[graft]
(biology)
To unite to form a graft.
A piece of tissue transplanted from one individual to another or to a different place on the same individual.
An individual resulting from the grafting of parts.
(botany)
To unite a scion to an understock in such manner that the two grow together and continue development as a single plant without change in scion or stock.

graft

To join a scion, shoot, or bud to the stock of another similar plant.

graft

1. Horticulture
a. a piece of plant tissue (the scion), normally a stem, that is made to unite with an established plant (the stock), which supports and nourishes it
b. the plant resulting from the union of scion and stock
c. the point of union between the scion and the stock
2. Surgery a piece of tissue or an organ transplanted from a donor or from the patient's own body to an area of the body in need of the tissue
References in periodicals archive ?
Cartilage reinforcement graft versus fascia graft in tympanoplasty.
Even with the most experienced hand success rate of Tympanoplasty using Temporalis fascia graft is not 100%.
This study was therefore conducted to assess not only the anatomical results, but also functional results of tympanoplasty with cartilage graft in terms of hearing improvement and compare the results with those of tympanoplasty with temporalis fascia graft.
Results of the traditional fascia graft myringoplasty remain consistent within the four-decade period at our institution.
Only a few RCTs have been published in which primary type I tympanoplasty with a partial-thickness (0.5 mm) cartilage shield graft has been compared with a temporalis fascia graft in patients with inactive mucosal chronic otitis media (table 1).
A properly dried temporalis fascia graft of appropriate size is introduced through the ear canal.
Use of the postauricular fascia graft can produce predictable results in rhinoplasty patients requiring soft-tissue augmentation.
Patients after canal wall down mastoidectomy surgery for cholesteatoma were reconstructed using septal cartilage and cortical mastoid bone grafts as strut in between temporalis fascia graft and stapes suprastructure.
The area was repaired with a free temporalis fascia graft, Avitene, Gelfoam, and a middle meatal spacer.
On otoscopy, the native tympanic membrane remnant was seen in the anteroinferior quadrant, and a remnant of the medialized temporalis fascia graft was seen between the eardrum remnant and the umbo (figure).