fascia

(redirected from Fascia lata)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

fascia

(făsh`ēə), fibrous tissue network located between the skin and the underlying structure of muscle and bone. Fascia is composed of two layers, a superficial layer and a deep layer. Superficial fascia is attached to the skin and is composed of connective tissue containing varying quantities of fat. It is especially dense in the scalp, the back of the neck, and the palms of the hands, where it serves to anchor the skin firmly to underlying tissues. In other areas of the body it is loose and the skin may be moved freely back and forth. Deep fascia underlies the superficial layers, to which it is loosely joined by fibrous strands. It is thin but strong and densely packed, and serves to cover the muscles and to partition them into groups.

Fascia

A broad horizontal member or molding with nominal thickness, projecting from the wall.

Fascia

 

an architectural element in the form of a rectangular projection. Fasciae are seen at the base of columns and as part of cornices. They are not always only decorative elements. A fascia may be used to support the cross pieces forming the icon shelf of an iconostasis or to protect a wall from water seepage. In the latter case, the fascia usually slopes away from the wall, forming a stone drip.


Fascia

 

the connective tissue investing organs, vessels, and nerves and forming the sheaths of muscles in man and other vertebrate animals; it performs supporting and trophic functions.

Superficial, or subcutaneous, fasciae are located under a fatty subcutaneous layer; in man, fasciae under the skin of the sole and the palm and under the scalp form aponeuroses. Deep fasciae invest individual muscles or muscle groups. Outgrowths of deep fasciae form intermuscular barriers, which may serve as points of muscle termination and attachment. In many parts of the body, especially in the extremities, the fascial system acts as a spring. When muscles contract, the fasciae shift their position, compressing or relaxing the neural and vascular sheaths, thus facilitating the flow of blood toward the heart. Some fasciae, such as the endothoracic fascia, line internal cavities. Fasciae are richly supplied with blood vessels and nerves.

fascia

[′fā·shə]
(building construction)
A wide board fixed vertically on edge to the rafter ends or wall which carries the gutter around the eaves of a roof.
(histology)
Layers of areolar connective tissue under the skin and between muscles, nerves, and blood vessels.

fascia, facia

1. Any flat horizontal member or molding with little projection, as the bands into which the architraves of Ionic and Corinthian entablatures are divided.
2. Any relatively narrow vertical surface (but broader than a fillet) which is projected or cantilevered or supported on columns or element other than a wall below. Also see platband.

fascia

, facia
1. the flat surface above a shop window
2. Architect a flat band or surface, esp a part of an architrave or cornice
3. Anatomy fibrous connective tissue occurring in sheets beneath the surface of the skin and between muscles and groups of muscles
4. Biology a distinctive band of colour, as on an insect or plant
5. Brit a less common name for dashboard
References in periodicals archive ?
Posterior arthrotomy (a); marking and preservation of the ulnar nerve (yellow loop) (b); debridement of the ulnohumeral joint (c, d); good cartilage quality on the radial head (d); debrided ulnohumeral joint (e); interposition arthroplasty with sutured fascia lata graft, like a waterfall (f).
It is important to highlight that tensile strength alone is not capable of predicting success in reconstructive urogenital surgery, and fascia lata and acellular dermis (both quite strong) also have high relapse rate before 2 years of surgery [19, 43] showing that, for biocompatible absorbable materials, remodelling in the host is probably of higher importance than the initial tensile strength of the implant [44].
KEYWORDS: Fascia Lata Sling, Interpalpebral Fissure Height, Ptosis.
In 1881, Carl Hueter first described the anterior approach to the hip in his "Compendium of Surgery." He described the interval between the sartorius and the tensor fascia lata and the gluteus medius.
Use of autogenous fascia lata graft for perineal herniorrhaphy in dogs.
Autogenous fascia lata (AFL) is the material of choice [2-5]; however, it is not only difficult to harvest needing surgical expertise but also causes scarring to the patients leg.
De las disecciones realizadas en la region pelvitrocanterica, se observo que el musculo gluteo superficial (gluteus superficialis) de forma triangular, con su base proximal, cubrio al gluteo medio y en craneal se confundio con el tensor de la fascia lata, originandose en la cresta sacra media.
Iatrogenically induced hernia, involving rectus femoris and vastus lateralis, can occur as a complication following an anterolateral thigh perforator flap and after fascia lata harvest for cruciate ligament repair.
Midurethral mesh tape slings have become a popular surgical option for stress urinary incontinence, due in large part to their ease of placement and comparable success rates compared to other anti-incontinence procedures such as the Burch urethropexy and the fascia lata slings.
Controver- sy arises over whether to place alloplastic materials (Proplast Teflon Silastic Methyl methacrylate etc.) or autogenous tissues (fascia lata muscle full thickness skin or cartilage) into the defect.15-19 The alloplastic materials have the problems associated with the use of foreign body as well as those of displacement and extrusion.