Fast

(redirected from fast food)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

fast

1. Sport (of a playing surface, running track, etc.) conducive to rapid speed, as of a ball used on it or of competitors playing or racing on it
2. Photog
a. requiring a relatively short time of exposure to produce a given density
b. permitting a short exposure time
3. Cricket (of a bowler) characteristically delivering the ball rapidly

Fast

 

a ban for a certain period of time prescribed by some religions against eating any food or certain types of food, particularly meat, fish, and dairy products. The origin of fasts is connected with restrictions dictated by the cult in the very early class societies. The roots of the practice go back to remote antiquity, when insufficient food demanded self-restrictions in eating, which acquired the form of a ban, or taboo, sanctified by custom.

In modern religions, fasting is based on the doctrine of the preeminence of the spirit over the flesh. In Christianity, Islam, and Judaism, fasting serves to reinforce the piety of the believers.

In Eastern Orthodoxy, four lengthy periods of fasting are prescribed. Lent, or the Great Fast, lasts seven weeks; St. Peter’s Fast continues from one to five weeks, depending on when Easter is observed; the Assumption fast lasts two weeks; and the Christmas fast extends over six weeks. In addition, there are one-day fasts on Wednesday and Friday of each week and on certain other days, such as the vigil of the Epiphany and Holy Cross Day. During a fast, meat and dairy foods are excluded. In all, the Eastern Orthodox Church sanctions about 200 days of fasting per year.

There are no prolonged fasts in Catholicism. Fasts are observed on Ash Wednesday, Good Friday, and the vigils of Assumption and Christmas. With the exception of the Anglican Church, obligatory fasts are unknown in Protestantism.

In Islam, the main fast is the uraza, during which, throughout the entire month of Ramadan, eating, drinking, and smoking are forbidden each day from sunrise to sunset. There also exist individual fasts, practiced in fulfillment of vows or for “redemption” with regard to violations by the believer of the precepts of the Koran and the sharia.

In Judaism, there are both public fasts, prescribed as a sign of mourning, on days of repentance, and in memory of various events in the history of the people, and individual fasts in fulfillment of a vow.

In present-day circumstances, when for the sake of strengthening the shaky position of religion various churches have modernized their dogmas and liturgies, a more flexible approach has been taken toward fasts, which are not required to be as strictly observed.

A. V. BELOV, L. I. KLIMOVICH, and M. S. BELEN’KII

fast

[fast]
(graphic arts)
A relative term given to the speed of emulsion.

FAST

(body)
Federation Against Software Theft.

FAST

(language)

Fast

An asynchronous communications protocol used to quickly transmit files over high-quality lines. Error checking is done after the entire file has been transmitted.
References in periodicals archive ?
As a result, fast food firms have been reacting to the changing tastes and nutritional expectations of customers.
However, he noted that despite the reported negative effects of fast food, the public continues to increase its consumption.
"YouGov data shows that although people are aware of the adverse effects of eating fast food and show general concern in lack of controls around its advertising, there is no direct resistance in overall consumption of fast food," she said.
It added: "Chicken fast food is increasingly perceived as a healthier alternative to burger fast food."
Every time at all hours every restaurant seems to be seated with people which itself signifies the overpowering likeness for fast food in Pakistan.
6Wresearch research associate Akash Jain said in a statement: "Take-away outlets are the major selling points for fast food joints in Saudi Arabia due to quick servicing, better network reach and adaptability to local needs."
A recent report in Bloomberg News noted that a chicken fast food chain in Pakistan plans to open an additional 40 outlets in the country over the next five years, expanding its current network of 64 outlets in 18 cities.
A 2017(http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acs.estlett.6b00435) study , done by researchers from Silent Spring Institute, the University of California, Berkeley, the University of Notre Dame and other institutions, published in the journal "Environmental Science & Technology Letters" found that among 400 fast food packages surveyed from restaurants in the country, 33 percent of them contained some form of the chemical fluorine.
Overall, 79% of respondents ate fast food at least once and 23% ate three or more meals during any one of the weeks recorded in the study.
Fast food chains sometimes merge during a recession to grab a bigger share of the market and increase profits.
McDonalds, KFC and Hardees are few of the renowned fast food chains which are running successfully in Pakistan.
Rapidly changing eating patterns and changing lifestyles among these emerging economies are fuelling the growth of fast food restaurants.