Fast

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fast

1. Sport (of a playing surface, running track, etc.) conducive to rapid speed, as of a ball used on it or of competitors playing or racing on it
2. Photog
a. requiring a relatively short time of exposure to produce a given density
b. permitting a short exposure time
3. Cricket (of a bowler) characteristically delivering the ball rapidly
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Fast

 

a ban for a certain period of time prescribed by some religions against eating any food or certain types of food, particularly meat, fish, and dairy products. The origin of fasts is connected with restrictions dictated by the cult in the very early class societies. The roots of the practice go back to remote antiquity, when insufficient food demanded self-restrictions in eating, which acquired the form of a ban, or taboo, sanctified by custom.

In modern religions, fasting is based on the doctrine of the preeminence of the spirit over the flesh. In Christianity, Islam, and Judaism, fasting serves to reinforce the piety of the believers.

In Eastern Orthodoxy, four lengthy periods of fasting are prescribed. Lent, or the Great Fast, lasts seven weeks; St. Peter’s Fast continues from one to five weeks, depending on when Easter is observed; the Assumption fast lasts two weeks; and the Christmas fast extends over six weeks. In addition, there are one-day fasts on Wednesday and Friday of each week and on certain other days, such as the vigil of the Epiphany and Holy Cross Day. During a fast, meat and dairy foods are excluded. In all, the Eastern Orthodox Church sanctions about 200 days of fasting per year.

There are no prolonged fasts in Catholicism. Fasts are observed on Ash Wednesday, Good Friday, and the vigils of Assumption and Christmas. With the exception of the Anglican Church, obligatory fasts are unknown in Protestantism.

In Islam, the main fast is the uraza, during which, throughout the entire month of Ramadan, eating, drinking, and smoking are forbidden each day from sunrise to sunset. There also exist individual fasts, practiced in fulfillment of vows or for “redemption” with regard to violations by the believer of the precepts of the Koran and the sharia.

In Judaism, there are both public fasts, prescribed as a sign of mourning, on days of repentance, and in memory of various events in the history of the people, and individual fasts in fulfillment of a vow.

In present-day circumstances, when for the sake of strengthening the shaky position of religion various churches have modernized their dogmas and liturgies, a more flexible approach has been taken toward fasts, which are not required to be as strictly observed.

A. V. BELOV, L. I. KLIMOVICH, and M. S. BELEN’KII

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

fast

[fast]
(graphic arts)
A relative term given to the speed of emulsion.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

FAST

(body)
Federation Against Software Theft.

FAST

(language)
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

Fast

An asynchronous communications protocol used to quickly transmit files over high-quality lines. Error checking is done after the entire file has been transmitted.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
Color fastness properties were explored using SDC test methods and CIE color coordinates L*, a*, b* were all recorded on a Datacolor Spectroflash-650 instrument.
The dyeability as well as color fastness of the grafted PTTA fiber improved through formation of ionic bonds between the AA in grafted polymer chains and the cationic dye in addition to hydrophilic interactions between the MA in the grafted polymer chains and hydrophilic matrix of the dye.
Colour fastness to rubbing was assessed by a standard white fabric against the dyed sample under wet and dry conditions using Crocmeter 238 A of SDLA (Shirley Development Laboratories Atlas Inc., USA) according to LVS EN ISO 105-X12:2016 [10].
Also the effect of temperature on fastness properties of dyed acrylic, polyester and polyester/acrylic blended fabrics.
But the talks given by our panelists and now collected in this forum put real pressure on that hasty premise by demanding and provoking a more sustained engagement with what, exactly, the idea of being "fastened to fastness" might actually mean and entail.
washing fastness rubbing fastness change of shade and colour difference properties) were determined and compared with those of conventionally dyed fabric samples.
Key words:Antioxidant,Cotton fabric,Light fastness,Reactivedyes,ultraviolet absorbers, Durability.E-mail:gnalankilli@yahoo.com,
Using only 5% or less unfixed dye instead of the conventional 15-30%, Avitera SE greatly reduces the number of rinsing baths required to obtain fastness properties.
Color fastness to soaping and rubbing were examined in accordance with Textiles Test Specification for Color Fastness (GB3921.3-1997 and GB3920-1997) based on ISO international standards, which are included in the national standards of China.
The fastness to light, sublimation and perspiration of dye pattern was assessed according to British standard: 1006-1978 and the wash fastness test according to Indian standard: IS: 765-1979.
In it, we're blinded by gold, the hanging fastness of gold, and feel a sense of vanishing into the pattern of the whole, or perhaps willingly becoming part of it, comprised as it is of thread and weft, gold upon gold-- Or else perhaps this place of ornament and gold is the Art Nouveau robe in which the two of us are wrapped and is bright as Renaissance haloes and Byzantine gold-leaf slashed in purple, jonquil and Florentine green and shawled by these chandeliers, hemmed in glittery crystal; and even though we sit the width of a cloth apart and are attended by waiters who are kindly but cool we like to be so wrapped, wrapped together until mere shape in a field of sensation, and turned fold by fold-- impulse by impulse--into fabulous, old scrolled gold.
There are some researches where fastness properties and colour values [6] of the plant dyes, effects of the anionic agents on dyeing [7], effects of the process parameters on dyeing, mordant enzyme complex applications [8] reducing the usage amounts of the mordants that may have a environmental burden, UV protection and antimicrobial properties of the natural dye are examined [9].