Fast

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fast

1. Sport (of a playing surface, running track, etc.) conducive to rapid speed, as of a ball used on it or of competitors playing or racing on it
2. Photog
a. requiring a relatively short time of exposure to produce a given density
b. permitting a short exposure time
3. Cricket (of a bowler) characteristically delivering the ball rapidly

Fast

 

a ban for a certain period of time prescribed by some religions against eating any food or certain types of food, particularly meat, fish, and dairy products. The origin of fasts is connected with restrictions dictated by the cult in the very early class societies. The roots of the practice go back to remote antiquity, when insufficient food demanded self-restrictions in eating, which acquired the form of a ban, or taboo, sanctified by custom.

In modern religions, fasting is based on the doctrine of the preeminence of the spirit over the flesh. In Christianity, Islam, and Judaism, fasting serves to reinforce the piety of the believers.

In Eastern Orthodoxy, four lengthy periods of fasting are prescribed. Lent, or the Great Fast, lasts seven weeks; St. Peter’s Fast continues from one to five weeks, depending on when Easter is observed; the Assumption fast lasts two weeks; and the Christmas fast extends over six weeks. In addition, there are one-day fasts on Wednesday and Friday of each week and on certain other days, such as the vigil of the Epiphany and Holy Cross Day. During a fast, meat and dairy foods are excluded. In all, the Eastern Orthodox Church sanctions about 200 days of fasting per year.

There are no prolonged fasts in Catholicism. Fasts are observed on Ash Wednesday, Good Friday, and the vigils of Assumption and Christmas. With the exception of the Anglican Church, obligatory fasts are unknown in Protestantism.

In Islam, the main fast is the uraza, during which, throughout the entire month of Ramadan, eating, drinking, and smoking are forbidden each day from sunrise to sunset. There also exist individual fasts, practiced in fulfillment of vows or for “redemption” with regard to violations by the believer of the precepts of the Koran and the sharia.

In Judaism, there are both public fasts, prescribed as a sign of mourning, on days of repentance, and in memory of various events in the history of the people, and individual fasts in fulfillment of a vow.

In present-day circumstances, when for the sake of strengthening the shaky position of religion various churches have modernized their dogmas and liturgies, a more flexible approach has been taken toward fasts, which are not required to be as strictly observed.

A. V. BELOV, L. I. KLIMOVICH, and M. S. BELEN’KII

fast

[fast]
(graphic arts)
A relative term given to the speed of emulsion.

FAST

(body)
Federation Against Software Theft.

FAST

(language)

Fast

An asynchronous communications protocol used to quickly transmit files over high-quality lines. Error checking is done after the entire file has been transmitted.
References in periodicals archive ?
In some case, doctors may give the go ahead to fast. This always includes certain caveats to ensure no health complications arise before, during and after the fast.
Iftar usually occurs with families and friends, where the fast is often broken with dates.
It is reported in the authentic ahadith that the Holy Prophet (PBUH), used to fast most of the month in Sha'ban.
In fact, short-term fasts actually boost metabolism.
And keep in mind you can start small -- many people start with a 12-hour fast and work their way up to the 16-hour fast/eight-hour feed schedule over the course of a week.
For example in Iran, around 70% of pregnant women will fast during the month of Ramadan, whereas in England and Singapore this has been reported to be around 90%.1 In a cross sectional study from our region, including more than 300 women, 88% of the women thought fast during pregnancy was obligatory, in the presence of good health, whereas 12% thought otherwise.2 There are few studies on the impact of fasting on pregnancy.
People who have their diabetes under control may be able fast. However, their doctors may require them to change their medication to help them take tablets outside fasting hours.
What to eat and drink at iftar and sehri: Iftar - when breaking the fast, go for plenty of fluids, low fat, fluid-rich foods and foods containing some natural sugars for energy.
Zayd relates: 'The Prophet, peace and mercy of God upon him, used to fast so many days in succession that we said, 'He will never break his fast.' At other times he would go without fasting for so long until we said, 'He will never again fast;' except for two days, which he would fast even if they occurred during the times he was not fasting consecutive days.
After a few days of the fast, higher levels of endorphin appear in the blood, making you more alert and giving an overall feeling of general mental well being.
In one study, rats undergoing alternate-day fasting lived 83% longer than rats who were not fasted. Interestingly, human data suggest that food consumption on the nonfasting days does not result in caloric consumption to cover the caloric deficit on the fasted day.
The number of hours that Muslims must fast will vary based on where they live.