fat necrosis


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Related to fat necrosis: Subcutaneous fat necrosis

fat necrosis

[¦fat nə′krō·səs]
(medicine)
Pathologic death of adipose tissue often accompanied by soap production from the hydrolyzed fat; associated with pancreatitis.
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References in periodicals archive ?
A case of nodular cystic fat necrosis with systemic lupus erythematosus presenting the multiple subcutaneous nodules on the extremities.
This leads to crystal formation, fat necrosis, and inflammation when the fat is subjected to such stresses as vascular compromise or trauma.
Some of these entities include radial scar, sclerosing adenosis, fibroadenoma, fat necrosis, and pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia.
A single case of fat necrosis was reported in 50 yrs.
The predominant finding was fat necrosis with wide variety of benign appearance on imaging.
However, in patients with fat necrosis, localized abscesses or foreign body granulomas, the most common finding on sonography was localized masses with coarse margins and showed avascularity or low blood supply.
As a result of fat necrosis, such abscesses may manifest as numerous pockets with multiple, interconnected foci.
Postoperative complications included bleeding 0.5% (liver bed n=1 omentum n=1) biliary peritonitis due to cystic duct leak 0.25% (n=1) intra-abdominal collection/abscess 0.5% (biloma n=1 subphrenic abscess n=1) subcutaneous fat necrosis right flank around drain site 0.25% (n=1) umbilical trocar site infection 2% (n=8) keloid at umbilical port site 0.25% (n=1) and incisional hernia at umbilicus 0.25% (n=1) as shown in fig.
Histologic examination demonstrated extensive fat necrosis with granulomatous inflammation, characterized by cords of necrotic fat surrounded by multinucleated giant cells and epithelioid macrophages with scattered lymphocytes and plasma cells and rare heterophils.
Subcutaneous fat necrosis of the newborn (SCFN) is a rare, benign, and self-limiting panniculitis of neonates that presents in the first few weeks of life.
(4) Fat necrosis is rare and secondary to injury or trauma.
The false positive results occur because of some benign diseases with hypercellularity like cellular fibroadenoma, proliferative fibrocystic disease, phyllodes tumor, lactational changes, sclerosing adenosis, and so forth, and in lesions with atypia like postradiation, fat necrosis, and radial scar [9].