fatalistic suicide

fatalistic suicide

a form of SUICIDE identified by DURKHEIM (1897) which arises from ‘oppressive regulation’ and from ‘physical or moral despotism’, e.g. the suicide of slaves. Thus, Durkheim suggested that this form of suicide could be considered the opposite of ANOMIC SUICIDE.
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The other extremes of egoistic suicide and anomic suicide (known as altruistic suicide and fatalistic suicide, respectively) are also related to high suicide rates, but were not generally applicable to modern western societies (18).
Fatalistic suicide is possible fallout of a highly regulated, social environment where the individual sees no possible way to improve his or her life.
The final type of suicide is fatalistic suicide, "at the high extreme of the regulation continuum" (15).
He may have considered fatalistic suicide the least likely to occur, or perhaps he included it simply to round out the logic of his larger theory.
But, as we shall see, there could be almost no fatalistic suicide.
Durkheim declined to look in detail at fatalistic suicide because he claimed that "it has so little contemporary importance and examples are so hard to find .
109) Durkheim's definition of fatalistic suicide as resulting "from excessive regulation," whose "passions [were] violently choked by oppressive discipline," seemed to describe nineteenth-century military life perfectly.
Modern sociologists have noted that altruistic and fatalistic suicides are rare in modern industrialized societies and that it is often difficult to measure empirically social regulation apart from social integration.