fatalistic suicide

fatalistic suicide

a form of SUICIDE identified by DURKHEIM (1897) which arises from ‘oppressive regulation’ and from ‘physical or moral despotism’, e.g. the suicide of slaves. Thus, Durkheim suggested that this form of suicide could be considered the opposite of ANOMIC SUICIDE.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
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Fatalistic Suicide: Fatalistic suicide may occur due to over-regulation of laws and discipline contradictory to individual self (A child commits suicide for failing in exams).
Her suicide is a "fatalistic suicide" which cancels a restrictive and limiting future existence.
The other extremes of egoistic suicide and anomic suicide (known as altruistic suicide and fatalistic suicide, respectively) are also related to high suicide rates, but were not generally applicable to modern western societies (18).
Fatalistic suicide is possible fallout of a highly regulated, social environment where the individual sees no possible way to improve his or her life.
The final type of suicide is fatalistic suicide, "at the high extreme of the regulation continuum" (15).
Durkheim's altruistic and fatalistic suicide. In W.S.F.
The book's most important and original contribution to Durkheim studies consists of rethinking the pivotal place of the related and residual concepts of "the forced division of labour" and "fatalistic suicide" in transfiguring the political implications of Durkheim's conceptual scheme.
Suicide rates are also high when the degree of social regulation, i.e., the degree to which the desires and behaviors of the members of the society are controlled by societal norms and customs is very low (leading to anomic suicide) or very high (leading to fatalistic suicide).
But, as we shall see, there could be almost no fatalistic suicide.
As Durkheim explained in his footnote, fatalism "derives from excessive regulation, that of persons with futures pitilessly blocked and passions violently choked by oppressive discipline." Durkheim declined to look in detail at fatalistic suicide because he claimed that "it has so little contemporary importance and examples are so hard to find ...
"It is a general fact in all European countries," wrote Durkheim, "that the suicidal aptitude of soldiers is much higher than that of the civilian population of the same age." (109) Durkheim's definition of fatalistic suicide as resulting "from excessive regulation," whose "passions [were] violently choked by oppressive discipline," seemed to describe nineteenth-century military life perfectly.
Durkheim identified fatalistic suicides as those caused by an excess of regulation.