Fatality

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Fatality

(pop culture)
Arch-villain assassin Fatality was bent on slaying Green Lantern during her reign of terror—not just Kyle Rayner, Earth's fifth Green Lantern, but all of the ring-bearing heroes. Co-created by writer Ron Marz and artist Darryl Banks, she first appeared in Green Lantern vol. 3 #83 (1997) as Yrra Cynril, the eldest child of a royal family of the planet Xanshi. When the planet is accidentally obliterated by Rayner's predecessor, Green Lantern John Stewart, she swears revenge on the entire Green Lantern Corps, an elite team of superpowered peacekeepers. As Fatality, the energy-blade-wielding super–martial artist, Cynril traveled the galaxy and defied time and space constraints in search of former Green Lanterns. After murdering them one by one, she arrived on Earth to face off with Rayner. Their battle culminated on a distant planet, where Fatality learned of Stewart's identity and pegged him as the Lantern responsible for her planet's demise. Although she ended up confronting Stewart (who was assisted by Jade, making for an interesting catfight), she presumably died in battle. Although Fatality's body was never found, that didn't stop her from reappearing in DC Comics' Villains United #2 (2005), in which she joined a massive assemblage of villains, part of Lex Luthor's Secret Society, in battle against the Secret Six (a small network of villains who oppose Luthor's grand-scale gathering). And with the resurrection of the Silver Age (1956–1969) Green Lantern, Hal Jordan, from the dead in 2005, she has yet another Emerald Crusader to despise. Although she has seldom appeared outside the comic-book pages, the space-traveling death-dealer was immortalized in a 2002 action figure from DC Direct.
References in periodicals archive ?
The fatalities from counter-violence operations by the security agencies increased by two-folds in Q3 compared to Q2.
The report also finds that Hispanic construction workers are not disproportionately victims of construction fatalities, as they account for 24 percent of the national workforce and 25 percent of deaths.
The reclassification of the fatalities' circumstances in the present study does not intend to present statistics on the exact reason or location of the losses; rather, we attempt to contextualize prominent responses and behaviors of the victims using a smaller number of classes that will facilitate more targeted warning and prediction approaches in the future.
The target for 2020 in the previous Cambodian NRSAP (2004) was set at 2 fatalities per 10, 000 motor vehicles.
The report said that from Islamabad and Gilgit Baltistan, no incidents of violence-related fatalities were reported.
The report said that violence related activities against sectarian groups rose drastically during this quarter from only 16 fatalities in Q2 to 52 in Q3.
SWANA added that that 11 of the fatalities during collection were the result of an employee being struck by a vehicle while working outside of a waste collection truck, with an additional four fatalities happening due to workers falling off a truck they were riding.
These incidents point to a volatile security situation in Punjab, the only province where violence-related fatalities registered an increase.
Although the oil and gas extraction industry's number of occupational fatalities increased 27.6% during the 11-year period, it did not increase as much as the number of workers, resulting in a significant decrease in the fatality rate of 36.3% (Table 2).
Mattar Al Tayer, Chairman of the Board and Executive Director of the RTA, said: "The new bridges to be constructed in a number of vital locations are selected in the light of traffic studies based on a number of perimetres such as traffic intensity, number of accidents and fatalities, maximum speed limit, number of lanes, population density on roadsides, distance to the nearest footbridge, location of bus stops, availability of markets and organisations, and locations witnessing high proportion of run-over accidents (Black Points).
Despite the large numbers of personnel and the categorical factors of risk, fatalities in this sector, let alone Alaska, are rare.
As the Texas Tribune reported in its Hurting For Work series this summer, Texas has led the nation in worker fatalities for seven of the last 10 years.