father

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father

History a senator or patrician in ancient Rome

Father

1. God, esp when considered as the first person of the Christian Trinity
2. any of the writers on Christian doctrine of the pre-Scholastic period
3. a title used for Christian priests
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

What does it mean when you dream about your father?

Next to mothers, fathers usually exert the most powerful influence over our psychological makeup. The appearance of the father or a father symbol in a dream is thus extraordinarily difficult to interpret, because the meaning depends so heavily on each individual’s experience with his or her own father. At a general level we can say that fathers represent power, authority, caring, the law, responsibility, and tradition. A father, as one of the co-producers of a new life, is also a creator.

The Dream Encyclopedia, Second Edition © 2009 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.

Father

(dreams)
Dreams with fathers in them can be looked at on several different levels. You may be dreaming about your father and expressing your feelings about him in a safe way. Traditionally, a father dream can be seen as symbolizing authority and power. In the dream you may be expressing your attitude about strengths and weaknesses as they relate to your position in life and your general attitude toward society. The image of the father could also represent the “collective consciousness, ” the traditional spirit, and the yang.
Bedside Dream Dictionary by Silvana Amar Copyright © 2007 by Skyhorse Publishing, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Alternatively, we may create a shorter version of the FPQ that uses fewer items from each scale so that investigators can measure all of the dimensions that make up the sense of being fathered as specified in this model.
It is fully possible that an inmate has no identity as a father even though he may have fathered a child; however, the focus of this paper is on those individuals who do have an identity as a father and who have an active confirmation process when they enter prison.
The focus on the subjective makes possible the exploration and unification of two significant dimensions of the father experience: first, the inner representational world of human consciousness as it involves the father experience, and second, the meaning of having a father or being fathered. Present-day research on paternal relationships focuses on the male parent himself, on the father role, and on father-child interaction, often in the context of other family relationships (Marsiglio, 1995; Pleck, 1997).