father

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father

History a senator or patrician in ancient Rome

Father

1. God, esp when considered as the first person of the Christian Trinity
2. any of the writers on Christian doctrine of the pre-Scholastic period
3. a title used for Christian priests
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

What does it mean when you dream about your father?

Next to mothers, fathers usually exert the most powerful influence over our psychological makeup. The appearance of the father or a father symbol in a dream is thus extraordinarily difficult to interpret, because the meaning depends so heavily on each individual’s experience with his or her own father. At a general level we can say that fathers represent power, authority, caring, the law, responsibility, and tradition. A father, as one of the co-producers of a new life, is also a creator.

The Dream Encyclopedia, Second Edition © 2009 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.

Father

(dreams)
Dreams with fathers in them can be looked at on several different levels. You may be dreaming about your father and expressing your feelings about him in a safe way. Traditionally, a father dream can be seen as symbolizing authority and power. In the dream you may be expressing your attitude about strengths and weaknesses as they relate to your position in life and your general attitude toward society. The image of the father could also represent the “collective consciousness, ” the traditional spirit, and the yang.
Bedside Dream Dictionary by Silvana Amar Copyright © 2007 by Skyhorse Publishing, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
North American studies that explore retrospective perceptions of fathering argue that adults' (both men and women) experiences and expectations of fathering are influenced by their relationships and experiences with their own fathers (Doherty, Kouneski, & Erickson, 1998; Guzzo, 2011; Lamb, 2010; Pleck, 2010).
The compensatory hypothesis stresses that many men feel the need to serve as role models to their own children in response to their lack of a perceived fathering role model when they were growing up (Daly; Guzzo, 2011).
Professionals need to convince young men that their health and well-being (and those of others) necessitate that they recognize the link between their sexual and procreative identities, as well as the association between their procreative and fathering identities.
* What do you believe your fathering philosophy will be if you become a father?
If men base their attitudes toward fathering on their experiences with their own father, then their perceptions of their father's participation in their upbringing, rather than father presence, would be particularly influential.
Their fatherhood attitudes are formed in opposition to their childhood experiences; they are determined to act differently than their own fathers and believe in the importance of fathering. Men with a social father or father-figure may hold more favorable attitudes toward fathering than men without a father-figure, as they may have had an opportunity to see father-like behaviors and thus use their experiences with social fathers as a contrast for their own father's perceived inadequacies.
One project focuses on the intergenerational learning of fatherhood--the linkages between the fathering a young man has received and his own fathering behavior, in the context of mothering and other aspects of family process.
Third, empirical research on fathering reveals that other family of origin influences, particularly the parental marriage and the mother's view of the father, affect the quality of the son's or daughter's relationship with his/her male parent.
Effects of commitment and psychological centrality on fathering. Journal of Marriage and Family, 64, 130-138.
(1998) explained fathering as a multilateral relationship with a range of influences, including mothers' expectations and behaviors, quality of the coparental relationship, economic factors, institutional practices, and employment opportunities.
Despite these challenges, these studies forged ahead and are yielding data that have the potential to improve our understanding of how these men father and how their fathering influences children's development.
The recent work of Silverstein and Auerbach (1999) more insidiously devalued fathering by reaffirming an emerging theme in behavioral science that the gender of the parent does not matter and the need for father may be met by any one of a number of caring adults, regardless of sex.