fathom

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fathom

1. a unit of length equal to six feet (1.829 metres), used to measure depths of water
2. Forestry a unit of volume equal to six cubic feet, used for measuring timber
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

fathom

[′fath·əm]
(oceanography)
The common unit of depth in the ocean, equal to 6 feet (1.8288 meters).
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Each day, the Navy produces, collects, and disseminates more volume of information than is humanly fathomable. Despite this undeniably large information footprint, we often find that we lack sufficient processes to enable this multitude of valuable data to fully benefit the mission.
The constellations, with their faraway mystery and yet fathomable predictability, were viewed as guiding lights and storytellers.
The collection is rich in images of the sublime, where the viewer is forced to grapple with the seen and the unseen, the fathomable and the unfathomable.
I know it's simply not fathomable to most women today, but we need to at least know that thinking exists and understand it in our industry.
THE PARADOX OF ELIOT PORTER'S nature photography is the paradox of postwar nature itself: nature at once more and less real than it had been before, more proximate and farther away, more readily fathomable and yet harder to see without state-of-the-art optical prosthetics.
Let us seek to fathom those things that are fathomable and reserve those things which are unfathomable for reverence in quietude.
IT'S an error that is hardly fathomable and our elections watchdog was right to issue a swift apology after allowing the name of murdered soldier Lee Rigby to be linked to an extreme right wing group.
Every week Mark will attempt to throw the most outrageous functions fathomable, from US frat parties to Harlem block bashes.
Ultimately, each decides that the only escape is murder, because even this seems more fathomable than divorce, which would be the ultimate social rejection of their prescribed identities as married man and woman.
Is it possible or even fathomable that generations later, we their children, are less aware or mindful?