fault current


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fault current

[′fȯlt ‚kə·rənt]
(electricity)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

fault current

An electrical current that flows from one conductor to ground (or to another conductor) because of an abnormal connection between the two.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
When the fault occurs, LCS is blocked and the fault current commutates to the IGBTs in the main switch (Figure 5(c)).
The equivalent circuit of the network segment was made up to receive the analytical dependence of the fault current on time (Figure 3).
Manufacturing and testing of MCP 2212 bifilar coils for a 10 MVA fault current limiter.
The analysis results indicated that the turnout faults could be diagnosed through the proposed method automatically with 100% accuracy for 5 typical fault current curves.
This results in high DC-link voltage and a higher initial fault current magnitude [7].
Considering the huge short circuit current, high fault current withstand capability equipment such as circuit breakers and buses should be applied.
From the existing simulation and experimental results of theoretical models and test prototypes, the expected functions of each type of SFCL are to suppress the fault current without time delay, compensate the voltage sag within an acceptable level, and improve the power system transient stability through the coordination with relay protection [7-10].
Compared with simulation results of Figures 5, 6, 7, and 9, the waveforms of inrush current and the inner fault current all have large amplitude.
The waveforms of the fault current at fault location X are given in Figure 4.
Figure 5 shows the ratio of negative to positive sequence of current and in Figure 6 above curve is angle between pre fault and post fault current, and down curve angle difference between fault voltage and current under normal condition.
Brookhaven National Laboratory's aFCL is a novel superconducting fault current limiter (FCL) that can transmit a large amount of electrical energy during the "on" state without any added conduction losses.

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