fault rock

fault rock

[′fȯlt ‚räk]
(geology)
A rock often found along a fault plane and made up of fragments formed by the crushing and grinding which accompany a dislocation.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The scratch lines, or striations, have been observed in fault rock faces for decades.
Petrographic work on the fault rock samples suggests a dominance of pyrite mineralization within a generally cryptocrystalline matrix carrying identifiable fine crystals of pyrite, quartz, opaque minerals, and amorphous silica (Figure 4(a)).
Gu, "Fold catastrophe model of mining fault rock burst," Chinese Journal of Rock Mechanics and Engineering, vol.
A geometric model of fault zone and fault rock thickness variations.
The generation of fault rock is intimately linked to the sliding of different lithologies past one another (Yielding et al., 1997).
Several studies have shown that the fault rock at the principal displacement zone of the central and northern sector of the GL segment is mainly composed by a more than 10 m thick clay rich "fault gouge" (Rutter et al., 1986; Rodriguez-Escudero et al.
They are not easy to identify, requiring evidence that the fault rock has passed through a melt phase.
Also common as clasts are quartz sandstone, red and black siltstone, chert, and cataclastic rocks (i.e., fault rock of Force and Barr 2006).
The Parc Guell thrust crops out at the western entrance of the Guell Park where a fault rock zone with breccias and gouges up to 15 m thick is visible.
summarizing fault rock terminology was published in 1984.
The following two types of fault seals have been recognized: juxtaposition seals and fault rock seals [31].